prion


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to prion: Prion disease, Prion protein

pri·on

(prī′ŏn′, prē′-)
n.
A protein particle that is the agent of infection in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie. Prions are the only known infectious agents that do not contain DNA or RNA. They derive from a normal body protein that becomes irreversibly misfolded, and they proliferate in the body, possibly by acting as a template for further protein misfolding.

[Alteration of pro(teinaceous) in(fectious particle).]

prion

(ˈpraɪən)
n
(Animals) any of various dovelike petrels of the genus Pachyptila of the southern oceans that have a serrated bill
[C19: New Latin, from Greek priōn a saw]

prion

(ˈpriːɒn)
n
(Microbiology) a protein in the brain, an abnormal form of which is thought to be the transmissible agent responsible for certain spongiform encephalopathies, such as BSE, scrapie, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and kuru
[C20: altered from pro(teinaceous) in(fectious particle)]

pri•on

(ˈpri ɒn, ˈpraɪ-)

n.
a tiny proteinaceous particle, likened to viruses and viroids, but having no genetic component, thought to be an infectious agent in bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and similar encephalopathies.
[1980–85; pr (oteinaceous) + i (nfectious) + -on1]

pri·on

(prē′ŏn)
A particle composed of protein, similar to a virus but lacking DNA or RNA. Prions are thought to be the agent of infection of some diseases of the nervous system.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prion - (microbiology) an infectious protein particle similar to a virus but lacking nucleic acid; thought to be the agent responsible for scrapie and other degenerative diseases of the nervous system
microbiology - the branch of biology that studies microorganisms and their effects on humans
subatomic particle, particle - a body having finite mass and internal structure but negligible dimensions
Translations
prioni
プリオン
프리온

prion

nPrion nt; prion proteinPrion-Protein nt

prion

n prion or prión m
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the topics are the function of prion protein and the family member shadoo, the effect of microglial inflammation in prion disease, clinical aspects of human prion diseases, bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie, and chronic wasting disease: the current assessment of transmissibility.
Sporadic prion diseases are classified according to phenotype as well as the pairing of the prion protein (PrP) genotype at the methionine (M)/valine (V) polymorphic codon 129 and the conformational characteristics of the abnormal or disease-associated PrP (Pr[P.sup.D]).
The term prion was introduced in 1982 by neurologist Stanley B.
In the Introduction of the article titled "A Case of Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Presenting as Conversion Disorder" [1], the text reading "Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rapidly progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by aggregation of misfolded prion proteins.
Cellular prion protein, Pr[P.sup.C], is a predominantly a-helical soluble glycoprotein which remains attached to the outer membrane of the cells through a glycol-phosphatidyl inositol linkage [1-3].
Experts say this marks a significant milestone in quest to better understand prion diseases in people, and could eventually aid the development of new therapies.
Prion levels were measured using a new, highly sensitive test.
Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of prion misfolded (PrPsc) protein, gliosis, synaptic dysfunction, and, at late stages, neuronal loss [1-5].
Prions are composed of pathogenic scrapie prion protein ([PrP.sup.Sc]), a misfolded isoform of cellular prion protein ([PrP.sup.C]) [6].
Due to his research potential and interest in the field he was granted PhD fellowship by Prion Research Group, department of Neurology, Georg-August University.
Susan Lindquist of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass., and colleagues tested plant proteins for prion power by swapping bits of them into yeast prions.