prisoner's dilemma


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prisoner's dilemma

n.
In game theory, a scenario in which two players can cooperate with or betray each other, with neither player knowing the strategy of the other, and the outcome for each player varying according to the combined outcome of both. It is used in various disciplines, such as economics, to model human interaction, and biology, to model altruism.

[From the common framing of the scenario as the story of two prisoners who are separately offered a plea bargain according to which the length of each prisoner's sentence depends on both his own decision to inform on the other and the other's decision to inform on him.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Two of them ran nicely; Prisoner's Dilemma finished second, but sixth home Postcode Envy may well turn out to be the best of them.
In March 2012 I was invited by John Stranlund, a professor at the Department of Resource Economics at the University of Massachusetts and a former student of mine at UC Santa Barbara, to give a report on my research paper resolving the Prisoner's Dilemma. The Prisoner's Dilemma is a situation in which two players could produce good results if they cooperate with each other but cannot do so easily, since one player will get even better results by not cooperating even if the other player does.
Chapters consider how writers John Barth (in The Tidewater Tales and Sabbatical) and Richard Powers (in Prisoner's Dilemma) regarded by Wallace as competitors anticipated many of his ideas and literary strategies, then discuss novels that address Wallace either directly or fictionally, namely Jonathan Franzen's Freedom, Jeffrey Eugenides' The Marriage Plot, Claire Messud's The Emperor's Children, and Lauren Groff's Fates and Furies, as well as Amy Hungerford's essay "On Not Reading DFW." (Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
The most notorious situation of this kind is known as the prisoner's dilemma. The metaphor behind the prisoner's dilemma is a story in which two accomplices are caught in the middle of a crime.
Frank's essay starts out with a familiar observation and complaint about people's responses to the prisoner's dilemma. Students in economics classes tend to defect more; among more ordinary people, many more cooperate than game theoreticians perhaps expect.
In strategic sciences, this situation is known as the prisoner's dilemma. Treaties, including the Madrid system, force member states to cooperate by dictating the response to any action, beating the prisoner's dilemma for realising gains from cooperation.
OKLAHOMA CITY The Oklahoma City Airport Trust's ongoing efforts to help Amazon.com develop a fulfillment center near Will Rogers World Airport seems to be yet another example of the prisoner's dilemma being played out by local government, University of Oklahoma economics professor Cynthia Rogers said.<br />In the game theory paradox, each prisoner is offered a benefit to fink on another prisoner, but if everyone holds steady, they all gain a bigger benefit.
One of these games was the prisoner's dilemma game.
This is clear throughout the book as Bowles discusses experimental games, such as the Prisoner's Dilemma, where defecting is assumed to be the self-interested option and cooperating the altruistic.
The authors further suggest testing this assumption by integrating nonverbal emotional displays (nonverbal expressiveness) within a social dilemma setting (e.g., Prisoner's Dilemma).
Led by Marko Jusup of Hokkaido University in Japan and Zhen Wang of Northwestern Polytechnical University in China, the researchers conducted a "social dilemma experiment" on 225 students in China, using a variation of the "prisoner's dilemma" game often used in studies of this sort.
King stipulates up-front that his book is about ideas--four big ideas, in fact: disequilibrium, radical uncertainty, prisoner's dilemma, and trust.
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