pristine


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pris·tine

 (prĭs′tēn′, prĭ-stēn′)
adj.
1.
a. Remaining in a pure state, without human alteration: a pristine stream.
b. Remaining free from dirt or decay; clean: pristine mountain snow.
2. Of, relating to, or typical of the earliest time or condition; primitive or original.

[Latin prīstinus; see per in Indo-European roots.]

pris·tine′ly adv.

pristine

(ˈprɪstaɪn; -tiːn)
adj
1. of or involving the earliest period, state, etc; original
2. pure; uncorrupted
3. fresh, clean, and unspoiled: his pristine new car.
[C15: from Latin pristinus primitive; related to prīmus first, prime]
Usage: The use of pristine to mean fresh, clean, and unspoiled is considered by some people to be incorrect

pris•tine

(ˈprɪs tin, prɪˈstin; esp. Brit. ˈprɪs taɪn)

adj.
1. having its original purity; uncorrupted or unsullied.
2. of or pertaining to the earliest period or state.
[1525–35; < Latin pristinus early; akin to prīmus first, prime]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pristine - completely free from dirt or contamination; "pristine mountain snow"
pure - free of extraneous elements of any kind; "pure air and water"; "pure gold"; "pure primary colors"; "the violin's pure and lovely song"; "pure tones"; "pure oxygen"
2.pristine - immaculately clean and unused; "handed her his pristine white handkerchief"
clean - free from dirt or impurities; or having clean habits; "children with clean shining faces"; "clean white shirts"; "clean dishes"; "a spotlessly clean house"; "cats are clean animals"

pristine

Translations

pristine

[ˈprɪstaɪn] ADJprístino

pristine

[ˈprɪstaɪn ˈprɪstiːn] adj [snow, beach] → immaculé(e)
pristine white → d'un blanc immaculé
in pristine condition → à l'état neuf

pristine

adj (= in unspoilt state) beautyunberührt, ursprünglich; conditiontadellos, makellos; (= original)urtümlich, ursprünglich

pristine

[ˈprɪstaɪn] adj (unspoiled) → immacolato/a, puro/a; (original) → originario/a
References in classic literature ?
But although the bodily powers of the great man were thus impaired, his mental energies retained their pristine vigour.
In the general intellectual decay they still preserved their pristine clearness and strength of understanding.
Thus fable reports that the fair Grimalkin, whom Venus, at the desire of a passionate lover, converted from a cat into a fine woman, no sooner perceived a mouse than, mindful of her former sport, and still retaining her pristine nature, she leaped from the bed of her husband to pursue the little animal.
In spite of a new suit of clothes, whose pristine folds refused to adapt themselves entirely to the contour of his figure, he was somewhat subdued by the unexpected elegance of the drawing-room of Christie's host.
At that epoch of pristine simplicity, however, matters of even slighter public interest, and of far less intrinsic weight than the welfare of Hester and her child, were strangely mixed up with the deliberations of legislators and acts of state.
Moreover the Hunsdens, once rich, were still independent; and report affirmed that Yorke bade fair, by his success in business, to restore to pristine prosperity the partially decayed fortunes of his house.
Having taken up arms and resorted to deeds of violence, with the great main object of preserving the Old Bailey in all its purity, and the gallows in all its pristine usefulness and moral grandeur, it would perhaps be going too far to assert that Mr Dennis had ever distinctly contemplated and foreseen this happy state of things.
The great elevation of these plains, and the dryness of the atmosphere, will tend to retain these immense regions in a state of pristine wildness.
The Saracens captured and pillaged Genoa nine hundred years ago, but during the following century Genoa and Pisa entered into an offensive and defensive alliance and besieged the Saracen colonies in Sardinia and the Balearic Isles with an obstinacy that maintained its pristine vigor and held to its purpose for forty long years.
Having frequently been in presence of the enemy, or, in other words, faced the ladies at Cheltenham and Bath, our friend, the Collector, had lost a great deal of his pristine timidity, and was now, especially when fortified with liquor, as talkative as might be.
And so, as I am not and, so far as one can judge, cannot be enchanted, she it is that is enchanted, that is smitten, that is altered, changed, and transformed; in her have my enemies revenged themselves upon me, and for her shall I live in ceaseless tears, until I see her in her pristine state.
And the separation is essential to the preservation of that institution in its pristine purity.