prithee


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prith·ee

 (prĭth′ē, prĭth′ē)
interj. Archaic
Used to express a polite request.

[Alteration of (I) pray thee.]

prithee

(ˈprɪðɪ)
interj
archaic pray thee; please
[C16: shortened from I pray thee]

prith•ee

(ˈprɪð i)

interj. Archaic.
(I) pray thee.
[1570–80; by shortening and alter.]
Translations

prithee

(archaic) [ˈprɪðiː] EXCLle ruego

prithee

interj (obs)bitte
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
1-5) I prithee, clear-voiced Muse, daughter of mighty Zeus, sing of the mother of all gods and men.
I believe I know more of people of quality than such as you.--But, prithee, without troubling me with any of your impertinence, do tell me what I can have for supper; for, though I cannot eat horse-flesh, I am really hungry." "Why, truly, madam," answered the landlady, "you could not take me again at such a disadvantage; for I must confess I have nothing in the house, unless a cold piece of beef, which indeed a gentleman's footman and the post-boy have almost cleared to the bone." "Woman," said Mrs Abigail
I love To make those fellows die for me, and I All the while look so scornfully, and then with my Head on one side, with a languishing eye I do so Kill 'em again: Prithee, what do they say of me, Chloe?
Then prithee, my good friend, said I, do write a preface for me; for here I have been hammering my pericranium and biting my nails these two hours, without being able to beat out a single sentence, either introductory or prefatory.
Thersites steps up the intensity and bluntness of his conversation: "Prithee, be silent, boy ...
Although similar in sentiment to a Neil Warnock whinge, a Shakesperean comment about Ye olde Dundering Ox's blatantly offside third by Ben the Miller - "Prithee we toil'd manfully through games lease, but fates did beftride us, af did that curs'd referee" - just doesn't cut it nowadays.
MENAPHON I will not stretch Your faith upon the tenters; prithee Pelias, Where didst thou learn this language?
Falstaff: I prithee, good Prince Hal, help me to my horse, good king's son.
Horneck renders it: "Prithee what Youth would st thou insnare, / Artless and clean, with flowing Hair?" These versions are reprinted in Storrs, Ad Pyrrham.
They appeal to the heart with the tender courtesy of King Lear's self-address, "Break, heart, I prithee break." (46) The modesty of their entreaty is underscored by that "let" (which takes gentle emphasis from the repetition that moves it from the middle of the line into the rhyme position) and by the tender jerkiness of their accents ("kind, / Charitable"), which form the impression of someone only tentatively suggesting at the comforts they might be afforded.
She utilizes a Machiavellian rhetoric when addressing him, even when merely whispering "I prithee now, my son: go to them, be with them, say to them.
Prithee, thou Staff for a which the or not question.