privatist

pri·vat·ism

 (prī′və-tĭz′əm)
n.
The social position of being noncommittal to or uninvolved with anything other than one's own immediate interests and lifestyle.

pri′va·tist adj. & n.
pri′va·tis′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

privatist

(ˈpraɪvɪˌtɪst)
n
(Sociology) a person who exhibits a lack of concern for public life
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Sa (25) points out the predominance of the American school to the detriment of the European in the model of training of the Brazilian physiotherapist, favoring the privatist logic of adult rehabilitation centers.
(Sometimes he explicitly says he is.) Jonathan McKenzie's argument is that the latter is the case and that this indifference is a virtue expressing Thoreau's privatist philosophy, a philosophy derived from Greek Stoic philosophers such as Socrates and Epictetus and compatible with post-modern philosophers such as Foucault.
privatist conception of local power" as "dominant" in the
But transcendent to this, Ojaide's concern in the volume is not an individuated, privatist brooding about exile as he boldly assumes the responsibility of the public poet with a communal voice and conscience, an office which demands courage and selfless abandonment for the public good.
privatist land ethic in sight, there has been a growing urgency to
The Catholic sacramental concept of the family governed principally by the church and the Protestant concepts of the family governed by the church and broader Christian community began to give way to a new privatist concept of the family whereby the wills of the marital parties became primary.
In this article, innovation is understood not as "a dreary dead end of meaningless experimentation, arbitrary innovation, or the lunatic's dance of esoteric, privatist aestheticism for its own sake.
"Afterword: Beyond the Privatist Consensus." The New Poverty Studies: The Ethnography of Power, Politics, and Impoverished People in the United States, Judith Goode and Jeff Maskovsky, eds.
(42.) Although we have seen that Habermas's concept of the lifeworld as providing the resources for normative integration through communicative rationality does not rely on Cartesian or Kantian ideals of privatist ratiocination either.
(Wittgenstein 1953, [section] 201) (7) But the reductio of privatist approaches to rule-following does in no way necessitate the social approaches if these latter are to be seen as implying that there must be something which is shared by the speakers: their linguistic dispositions, conventions or practices.