privatizer


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privatizer

(ˈpraɪvɪˌtaɪzə) or

privatiser

n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a person who promotes or facilitates privatization (of publicly owned businesses or services)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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For example, SDN Privatizer is a free, community-developed app that provides an alternative to legacy private VLAN functionality.
Netanyahu, it's true, is an enthusiastic privatizer, and his policies have helped create a class of fantastically wealthy Israelis and land Israel the No.
I recently wrote a book in which I tried to juice up the subject by suggesting that readers might want to imagine a privatizer as a cross between a pirate and a sanitizer - a guy with an eyepatch and a carpet steamer.
By 1992, Russia had a new slang term for privatization that combined the word for privatization (Russian: [RUSSIAN TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (privatizatziya)) with the verb [RUSSIAN TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (prikhvatits; to grab, to take improperly) to form [RUSSIAN TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (prikhvatizatziya), roughly translated as "grab-privatization." Top privatizer Anatoli Chubais was known as the [RUSSIAN TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (glavni prikhvatizator; the chief grab-privatizer).(27) Popular disgust with privatization strengthened the Communists and other anti-reform political parties.
The Czech Republic kicked out of government Vaclav Klaus, the great privatizer, and replaced his government with a more moderate one.
The privatizer portion of the agreement was unique: one company, NEO Corporation, was given the rights to the landfill gas and the digester gas.
Some changes recommended in the privatizer approach included improving financial records and information systems to provide a monthly target and accrual accounting system; emphasizing preventive maintenance over corrective maintenance; clarifying personnel policy issues; and streamlining purchasing and procurement.
* Our rural area has been fighting a water privatizer (water pirate) who wants to sell our water to an adjacent basin--for profit.
A privatizer must go to heroic lengths in cost-cutting to be able to offset the huge difference in financing costs created by this tax subsidy to the wealthy investors who purchase municipal bonds.
But the 1980 law that established the program was a privatizer's dream: It placed a tight limit on EPA's administrative budget, forcing it to rely heavily on contractors.
The winner of this contest is certain to be warlord and privatizer Automaht Regurgitov (Victor Toman), since he is the only candidate.
Bad news travels fast, especially when a privatizer smells a contract possibility.