probabiliorism


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probabiliorism

(ˌprɒbəˈbɪlɪəˌrɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the theory that in the case of doubt one should choose the action most likely to be right
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Probabiliorism (from the Latin, 'more likely') argues that one should adopt a position that had a preponderance of evidence on its side.
Supported by the papacy (which in 1679 condemned some laxist propositions) and by a minority network of Jesuits, he developed a new system called "probabiliorism": a more rigorous method to discern the solution for ethical issues.
(99) Probabiliorism, by contrast, held it was not lawful to act on the less-safe opinion unless it was more probable than the safe opinion.
Hastings, 'Probabiliorism', Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics, eds James Hastings, John A.
However, in the years of 1754 and 1755 and in the political context of the Seven Years' War, a series of events occurred which gradually inclined the Bourbon government to use regalism to favor anti-Jesuits (those that espoused the doctrine of probabiliorism which opposed Jesuit probabilism) and a new social class of manteistas, university-educated men of the lower nobility who had been excluded from the Jesuit-run colegios mayores and resented their strong influence.
For clerics and laymen, being a good patriot was to be an advocate of Thomism and probabiliorism, or at least an enemy of probabilism or Molinism.
The aura of probabiliorism evoked by his casuistic approach encourages readers to resolve this moral dilemma by approving the "most probable" response (morally speaking), but since Spenser has framed the matter as a choice between misplaced compassion that results in negligent inaction, or unfortunate violence that cultivates superior morality and civility, the reader is pressured to agree with Irenius.
Rose, supra note 46, observes at 72 that these "schools"--together with another, "probabiliorism"--existed within Catholic casuistry.
(11) Julia Fleming is less bothered by contemporary debates and offers wise counsel: "Anyone nonplussed by the recent 'method wars' can take comfort in the fact that moral dispute was not a twentieth-century invention, as the exchanges concerning Jansenism, laxism, probabilism, and probabiliorism copiously demonstrate.
Second, Ripalda generally followed in his theological methodology the system known at the time as "probabiliorism." That is, to say he was not satisfied to find a single theological source in order to pronounce an opinion to be tenable.