probability wave


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probability wave

n.
A wave whose amplitude at a given region and over a given time interval corresponds to the probability of observing a given particle within that region in that time.
References in periodicals archive ?
(3.) "I personally like to regard a probability wave, even in 3N-dimensional space, as a real thing, certainly as more than a tool for mathematical calculations.
The probability of finding the electron in the same place that you last looked decreases, and the probability of finding it somewhere else increases as the probability wave spreads out through the universe.
Body is the collection of previous occasions, processes, and events that shape the probability waves of the future.
For a detailed account of this debate, see Stoeger, "Epistemological and Ontological Issues." Schafer is drawing on the work of Villars, who explains: "Potentiality waves differ from probability waves in that the latter are usually conceived as abstract, mathematical devices which represent, in a statistical way, the behaviour of particles.
We want the probability wave to collapse in the area of our best-held dreams and visions of a better world and a healthier community.
Pomerans (New York: Harper, 1972), 122-23: "the mathematical symbols with which we describe such observational situations represent possibilities rather than facts." Kurt Riezler, to whom Heisenberg does not refer, had previously insisted that quantum physics would remain unintelligible until it reinterpreted what was described by the probability waves in terms of (a somewhat Heideggerized) Aristotelian concept of Being as potentiality and event: Physics and Reality (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1940), esp.
(9) Here, Heisenberg is referring not to the abstract mathematical probability waves in a multi-dimensional configuration space, but rather to the three dimensional field waves--for example, light waves (see also his response to Schrodinger, Physics and Philosophy, 117).
Even as Father Lawrence was hearing the stranger's confession, he dreamed of probability waves, black holes and temporal loops.
3 In the popular literature on quantum mechanics one often reads of 'probability waves'.
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