proboscis

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pro·bos·cis

 (prō-bŏs′ĭs, -kĭs)
n. pl. pro·bos·cis·es or pro·bos·ci·des (-bŏs′ĭ-dēz′)
1. A long flexible snout or trunk, as of an elephant.
2. A slender, tubular organ in the head region of an invertebrate, such as certain insects and worms, usually used for sucking or piercing.
3. A human nose, especially a prominent one.

[Latin, from Greek proboskis : pro-, in front; see pro-2 + boskein, to feed.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

proboscis

(prəʊˈbɒsɪs)
n, pl -cises or -cides (-sɪˌdiːz)
1. (Zoology) a long flexible prehensile trunk or snout, as of an elephant
2. (Zoology) the elongated mouthparts of certain insects, adapted for piercing or sucking food
3. (Zoology) any similar part or organ
4. informal facetious a person's nose, esp if large
[C17: via Latin from Greek proboskis trunk of an elephant, from boskein to feed]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro•bos•cis

(proʊˈbɒs ɪs, -kɪs)

n., pl. -bos•cis•es, -bos•ci•des (-ˈbɒs ɪˌdiz)
1. the trunk of an elephant.
2. any long flexible snout, as of the tapir.
3. the elongate, protruding process on the head of certain insects or worms, used for feeding or for sensing food.
4. Facetious. the human nose, esp. when large.
[1570–80; < Latin < Greek proboskís elephant's trunk =pro- pro-2 + bósk(ein) to feed + -is (s. -id-) n. suffix]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·bos·cis

(prō-bŏs′ĭs)
1. A long, flexible snout or trunk, as of an elephant.
2. The slender, tubular feeding and sucking organ of certain invertebrates, such as butterflies and mosquitoes.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proboscis - the human nose (especially when it is large)
nose, olfactory organ - the organ of smell and entrance to the respiratory tract; the prominent part of the face of man or other mammals; "he has a cold in the nose"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
2.proboscis - a long flexible snout as of an elephantproboscis - a long flexible snout as of an elephant
neb, snout - a long projecting or anterior elongation of an animal's head; especially the nose
elephant - five-toed pachyderm
mammoth - any of numerous extinct elephants widely distributed in the Pleistocene; extremely large with hairy coats and long upcurved tusks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

proboscis

noun
The structure on the human face that contains the nostrils and organs of smell and forms the beginning of the respiratory tract:
Informal: beak, snoot.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
خُرْطوم الفيل
chobotsosák
snabel
kärsä
rani; neftota
čiulptuvasstraublys
smecerissnuķis

proboscis

[prəʊˈbɒsɪs] N (proboscises or probocides (pl)) [prəʊˈbɒsɪdiːz]probóscide f, trompa ftrompa f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

proboscis

n (Zool, hum inf) → Rüssel m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

proboscis

(prəˈbosis) noun
a nose, or mouth-part in certain animals, insects etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Estas especies se caracterizan porque pueden cargar polen gracias a las estructuras especializadas que presentan sus proboscides (Gilbert 1972).
To verify nocturnal visitors carried pollen loads and therefore were potentially effective pollinators, proboscides of all nocturnal visitors collected (n = 22) were removed and placed in 80 [micro]L 70% EtOH.
Estas longitudes operativas extremadamente largas de las flores se corresponden en mayor o menor medida con la longitud de las proboscides de sus polinizadores en diferentes comunidades estudiadas (Nilsson et al., 1985; Haber & Frankie, 1989; Wasserthal, 1997; Agosta & Janzen, 2005; Anderson et al., 2010; Martins & Johnson, 2013).
The behavior observed was touching the odor source using their proboscides. All of the behavioral assays were performed between 9.00 a.m.
At concentrations of 25 and 50mg/mL, some morphological changes such as irregular abdomen and proboscides, deformed legs and antennae occurred were observed, with a total percentage of 36.6 and 20% of insects affected, respectively; for other concentrations, only 3.3% of insects had changes in their morphology (Table 2).
Of particular interest to dipterists generally was his description of vermileonids with elongated proboscides in genera such as Namaquamyia Stuckenberg and Perianthomyia Stuckenberg.
A sample of 3-5 specimens of all the butterfly species was used to examine the pollen carrying capacity of their proboscides. The results indicated that the proboscides invariably contained pollen grains ranging from 23-156 in Papilionids, 15-89 in Pierids, 35-213 in Nymphalids, 22-69 in Lycaenids and 31-93 in Hesperiids.
Para observar la distribucion de los ganchos, previamente se seccionaron las proboscides de 5 machos y 5 hembras y se transparentaron en una mezcla de alcohol-fenol, en algunas se hicieron cortes transversales.
These eversible proboscides are often used to remove prey from smaller gaps between sand grains (Meixner, 1938).
Nuculoma tennis, a detritus feeder, develops its palp proboscides, its feeding apparatus, during the prolonged phase of meiobenthic development (Harvey and Gage, 1995).
As proboscides of indigenous bees are too short to pollinate the clover introduced by 19th century settlers, long-tongued bumblebees were subsequently introduced from Europe (Donovan, 1990).