procaine

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pro·caine

 (prō′kān′)
n.
A white crystalline powder, C13H20N2O2, used chiefly in its hydrochloride form as a local anesthetic in medicine and dentistry.

[pro- + (co)caine (because it is the precursor of cocaine).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

procaine

(ˈprəʊkeɪn; prəʊˈkeɪn)
n
(Pharmacology) a colourless or white crystalline water-soluble substance used, as the hydrochloride, as a local anaesthetic; 2-diethylaminoethyl-4-amino benzoate. Formula: NH2C6H4COOC2H4N(C2H5)2. See also Novocaine
[C20: from pro-1 + (co)caine]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro•caine

(proʊˈkeɪn, ˈproʊ keɪn)

n.
a compound, C13H20N2O2, used chiefly as a local and spinal anesthetic.
[1915–20; pro-2 + (co) caine]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.procaine - a white crystalline powder (trade name Ethocaine) administered near nerves as a local anesthetic in dentistry and medicine
local anaesthetic, local anesthetic, topical anaesthetic, topical anesthetic, local - anesthetic that numbs a particular area of the body
Novocain, novocaine, procaine hydrochloride - procaine administered as a hydrochloride (trade name Novocain)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

procaine

n procaína, novocaína
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Procaine penicillin G at 50,000 U/ kg per dose intramuscularly in one dose each day.
IM procaine penicillin G 600,000 units 12 hourly started.
Contact tracing was initiated, and his parents were treated with procaine penicillin 2.4 million units intramuscularly as a single dose.
(10) Certain penicillin preparations (eg, combinations of benzathine penicillin and procaine penicillin) are not appropriate treatments because they do not provide adequate amounts of the antibiotic.
I/V, q 24h X 2 days, fortified Procaine penicillin @ 22000 IU/k.g I/M.
A veterinarian can often treat entropion by injecting 1 cc to 2 cc of procaine penicillin under the skin of the eyelid.
([section]) Newborn treatment for congenital syphilis might include either a 10-day course of aqueous crystalline or procaine penicillin G or one intramuscular dose of benzathine penicillin G, depending upon various factors related to 1) identification of syphilis in the mother; 2) adequacy of maternal treatment; 3) presence of clinical, laboratory, or radiographic evidence of syphilis in the neonate; and 4) comparison of maternal (at delivery) and neonatal serologic titers.
The mixture of benzathine penicillin and procaine penicillin gives a less painful injection.[13] Alternatively, a dilution of benzathine penicillin with 1% lidocaine has been shown to be well tolerated.[14] When given by mouth, penicillin can be given twice or three times daily instead of four times a day.
In another case, a pretty infamous one because the nurses ended up accused of negligent homicide, a physician ordered procaine penicillin to be given IM to a newborn infant who had been exposed to an infectious disease.
Consecutive daily treatment with procaine penicillin for 30 days was successful in all six sheep identified with pleural/superficial lung abscesses measuring 2-8 cm in diameter; only one of two sheep with more extensive lesions recovered.
Those with physician-confirmed omphalitis were treated for 7 days with topical gentian violet or oral cephalexin (as monotherapy) or topical gentian violet and oral cephalexin (combination therapy) at physician discretion, or injectable therapy (procaine penicillin and gentamicin) if clinical signs of sepsis were also present and family refused hospital referral.