procession

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procession

a line of people, animals, vehicles, etc., moving along in orderly succession
Not to be confused with:
precession – the act of preceding; precedence; the slow, conical motion of the earth’s axis of rotation
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

pro·ces·sion

 (prə-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1.
a. A group of persons, vehicles, or objects moving along in an orderly, formal manner.
b. The movement of such a group.
2. Theology Origination; emanation: the procession of the Holy Spirit.
intr.v. pro·ces·sioned, pro·ces·sion·ing, pro·ces·sions
To form or go in a procession.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin prōcessiō, prōcessiōn-, from Latin, an advance, from prōcessus, past participle of prōcēdere, to advance; see proceed.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

procession

(prəˈsɛʃən)
n
1. the act of proceeding in a regular formation
2. a group of people or things moving forwards in an orderly, regular, or ceremonial manner
3. (Music, other) a hymn, litany, etc, sung in a procession
4. (Theology) Christianity the emanation of the Holy Spirit
vb
(intr) rare to go in procession
[C12: via Old French from Latin prōcessiō a marching forwards]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro•ces•sion

(prəˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. the act of moving along or proceeding in orderly succession or in a formal and ceremonious manner.
2. a line or body of persons, vehicles, etc., moving along in such a manner.
3. the act of coming forth from a source.
v.i.
4. to go in procession.
[before 1150; early Middle English (< Old French) < Late Latin prōcessiō a religious procession. See process, -tion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Procession

 a group of people moving in an orderly state; a regular series; sequence or succession of things resembling a procession. See also cortège.
Examples: procession of stately aqueducts; of boats, 1839; of tradesman’s tools, 1688.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

procession


Past participle: processioned
Gerund: processioning

Imperative
procession
procession
Present
I procession
you procession
he/she/it processions
we procession
you procession
they procession
Preterite
I processioned
you processioned
he/she/it processioned
we processioned
you processioned
they processioned
Present Continuous
I am processioning
you are processioning
he/she/it is processioning
we are processioning
you are processioning
they are processioning
Present Perfect
I have processioned
you have processioned
he/she/it has processioned
we have processioned
you have processioned
they have processioned
Past Continuous
I was processioning
you were processioning
he/she/it was processioning
we were processioning
you were processioning
they were processioning
Past Perfect
I had processioned
you had processioned
he/she/it had processioned
we had processioned
you had processioned
they had processioned
Future
I will procession
you will procession
he/she/it will procession
we will procession
you will procession
they will procession
Future Perfect
I will have processioned
you will have processioned
he/she/it will have processioned
we will have processioned
you will have processioned
they will have processioned
Future Continuous
I will be processioning
you will be processioning
he/she/it will be processioning
we will be processioning
you will be processioning
they will be processioning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been processioning
you have been processioning
he/she/it has been processioning
we have been processioning
you have been processioning
they have been processioning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been processioning
you will have been processioning
he/she/it will have been processioning
we will have been processioning
you will have been processioning
they will have been processioning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been processioning
you had been processioning
he/she/it had been processioning
we had been processioning
you had been processioning
they had been processioning
Conditional
I would procession
you would procession
he/she/it would procession
we would procession
you would procession
they would procession
Past Conditional
I would have processioned
you would have processioned
he/she/it would have processioned
we would have processioned
you would have processioned
they would have processioned
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.procession - (theology) the origination of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost; "the emanation of the Holy Spirit"; "the rising of the Holy Ghost"; "the doctrine of the procession of the Holy Spirit from the Father and the Son"
theological system, theology - a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings; "Jewish theology"; "Roman Catholic theology"
inception, origination, origin - an event that is a beginning; a first part or stage of subsequent events
2.procession - the group action of a collection of people or animals or vehicles moving ahead in more or less regular formation; "processions were forbidden"
group action - action taken by a group of people
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
convoy - a procession of land vehicles traveling together
caravan, wagon train, train - a procession (of wagons or mules or camels) traveling together in single file; "we were part of a caravan of almost a thousand camels"; "they joined the wagon train for safety"
cavalcade - a procession of people traveling on horseback
march - a procession of people walking together; "the march went up Fifth Avenue"
motorcade - a procession of people traveling in motor cars
parade - a ceremonial procession including people marching
cortege - a funeral procession
recessional, recession - the withdrawal of the clergy and choir from the chancel to the vestry at the end of a church service
3.procession - the act of moving forward (as toward a goal)procession - the act of moving forward (as toward a goal)
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
push - an effort to advance; "the army made a push toward the sea"
career, life history - the general progression of your working or professional life; "the general had had a distinguished career"; "he had a long career in the law"
march - a steady advance; "the march of science"; "the march of time"
clear sailing, easy going, plain sailing - easy unobstructed progress; "after we solved that problem the rest was plain sailing"
leapfrog - advancing as if in the child's game, by leaping over obstacles or competitors; "the company still believes the chip is a leapfrog in integration and will pay huge dividends"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

procession

noun
1. parade, train, march, file, column, motorcade, cavalcade, cortege a funeral procession
2. sequence, run, course, train, series, cycle, string, succession a seemingly endless procession of corruption cases
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

procession

noun
1. A number of things placed or occurring one after the other:
Informal: streak.
2. A way in which things follow each other in space or time:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
průvodprocesí
optogprocession
kulkue
procesija
felvonulás
hóp-/skrúîganga; fylgd
行進
행렬
procesija
gājiensprocesija
procesia
sprevod
tåg
ขบวน
lễ diễu hành

procession

[prəˈseʃən] N [of people, cars etc] → desfile m; (= ceremonial, funeral) → cortejo m (Rel) → procesión f
to go or walk in processiondesfilar (Rel) → ir en procesión
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

procession

[prəˈsɛʃən] nprocession f
religious processions → processions religieuses
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

procession

n (organized) → Umzug m; (solemn) → Prozession f; (= line of people, cars etc)Reihe f, → Schlange f; funeral/carnival processionTrauer-/Karnevalszug m; to go or walk in processioneinen Umzug/eine Prozession machen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

procession

[prəˈsɛʃn] n (of people, cars) → processione f, corteo (Rel) → processione
funeral procession → corteo funebre
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

procession

(prəˈseʃən) noun
a line of people, vehicles etc moving forward in order, especially for a ceremonial purpose. The procession moved slowly through the streets.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

procession

مَوْكِب průvod optog Schlange πομπή procesión kulkue procession procesija processione 行進 행렬 stoet prosesjon procesja procissão процессия tåg ขบวน alay lễ diễu hành 队列
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Alice was rather doubtful whether she ought not to lie down on her face like the three gardeners, but she could not remember ever having heard of such a rule at processions; `and besides, what would be the use of a procession,' thought she, `if people had all to lie down upon their faces, so that they couldn't see it?' So she stood still where she was, and waited.
The fact was that the clouds had that year withheld their moisture from the earth, and in all the villages of the district they were organising processions, rogations, and penances, imploring God to open the hands of his mercy and send the rain; and to this end the people of a village that was hard by were going in procession to a holy hermitage there was on one side of that valley.
Life figures itself to me as a festal or funereal procession. All of us have our places, and are to move onward under the direction of the Chief Marshal.
They do not grow weary nor miss step, nor do they fall out of rank and sink by the wayside to be left contemplating the moving procession.
The noted visitors from foreign countries, who had all been transported to the Emerald City by means of the Magic Belt, were as much a show to the Ozites as were their own familiar celebrities, and the streets leading from the royal palace to the jeweled gates were thronged with men, women, and children to see the procession as it passed out to the green fields where the ceremonies were to take place.
He held himself ready to bestride the animal at a moment's notice, should flight become necessary; but he evidently thought that the procession of the faithful would pass without perceiving them amid the thick foliage, in which they were wholly concealed.
It denoted the advance of the procession of magistrates and citizens on its way towards the meeting-house: where, in compliance with a custom thus early established, and ever since observed, the Reverend Mr.
it is beautiful!' And they advised him to wear these new and magnificent clothes for the first time at the great procession which was soon to take place.
I was delighted with the procession of the inhabitants; but that of the Thracians was equally, if not more, beautiful.
The people, even among the respected republicans of the Seven Provinces, had no place assigned to them in the procession; they merely lined the streets.
All his retinue now strained their eyes, hoping to discover something on the looms, but they could see no more than the others; nevertheless, they all exclaimed, "Oh, how beautiful!" and advised his majesty to have some new clothes made from this splendid material, for the approaching procession. "Magnificent!
As soon as the last bit of desert was passed and all the procession, from the beautiful and dainty Ozma to the last soldier, had reached the grassy meadows of the Land of Ev, the magic carpet rolled itself together and entirely disappeared.