prodnose

prodnose

(ˈprɒdˌnəʊz)
n
an inquisitive person
vb (intr)
informal to make uninvited inquiries
References in periodicals archive ?
These include "moochin", a difficult or disagreeable person, from Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog; and '"to prodnose", to pry or be inquisitive, from Quite Early One Morning.
Besides prodnose, from Thomas' poem Quite Early One Morning, and moochin, from the short stories in Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog, the dictionary contains 635 quotations from the Welsh poet's works.
With two of the three relegation places now all but assured - Palace and Chelsea - the scrap is really on to stay out of the third place.Danny Baker @ prodnose
A 10-year-old of moderate intelligence could finish it inside five minutes and anyone remembering such famous figures as Freddie the fearless Fly or the archetypal prodnose Keyhole Kate knew the End was Nigh when it featured the likes of Cheryl Cole and Simon Cowell as "guests" along with Harry Hill and, sob, Jeremy Clarkson.
B@CKCHAT With two of the three relegation places now all but assured - Palace and Chelsea - the scrap is really on to stay out of the third place.Danny Baker @ prodnose We were rubbish today.
Yet another example of the prodnose puritanism that is rotting this blighted country ( "roll on de-mob" as we used to say in another time and another place.
The prodnose puritan tendency is on the crest of the circuit at the moment, but the movement of the wheel means that from now on its only movement can be downwards back into the muck.
Some prodnose parent complained because the puppet pair were speaking English, a language offensive to the tender ears of her offspring.
The inevitable pompous prodnose reckoned this, yes, Gave Offence to those nice bits of stuff.
Soldiers were lead but no health-and-safety prodnose appeared on Christmas morning to shout STOP SUCKING THEM.
So the name went into legend although a Woodbine Willie of today would doubtless be kicked out of Iraq or Afghanistan by some politically-correct prodnose anxious to save young infantrymen from the perils of nicotine poisoning.
Prodnoses, we old journos called them: a dying breed of men and women who cared passionately about accuracy over speed of delivery; editorial equivalents of the Roman slaves who shadowed emperors whispering "Thou art but mortal, Caesar" to prevent the big-head getting a God complex.