profane

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pro·fane

 (prō-fān′, prə-)
adj.
1. Marked by contempt or irreverence for what is sacred.
2. Nonreligious in subject matter, form, or use; secular: sacred and profane music.
3. Not admitted into a body of secret knowledge or ritual; uninitiated.
4. Vulgar; coarse.
tr.v. pro·faned, pro·fan·ing, pro·fanes
1. To treat with irreverence: profane the name of God.
2. To put to an improper, unworthy, or degrading use; abuse.

[Middle English prophane, from Old French, from Latin profānus, from prō fānō, in front of the temple : prō-, before, outside; see pro-1 + fānō, ablative of fānum, temple; see dhēs- in Indo-European roots.]

pro·fan′a·to′ry (prō-făn′ə-tôr′ē, prə-) adj.
pro·fane′ly adv.
pro·fan′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

profane

(prəˈfeɪn)
adj
1. having or indicating contempt, irreverence, or disrespect for a divinity or something sacred
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) not designed or used for religious purposes; secular
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) not initiated into the inner mysteries or sacred rites
4. vulgar, coarse, or blasphemous: profane language.
vb (tr)
5. to treat or use (something sacred) with irreverence
6. to put to an unworthy or improper use
[C15: from Latin profānus outside the temple, from pro-1 + fānum temple]
profanation n
profanatory adj
proˈfanely adv
proˈfaneness n
proˈfaner n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro•fane

(prəˈfeɪn, proʊ-)

adj., v. -faned, -fan•ing. adj.
1. showing irreverence toward God or sacred things; irreligious; blasphemous.
2. not devoted to holy purposes; secular (opposed to sacred).
3. unholy; heathen; pagan: profane rites.
4. not initiated into religious rites or mysteries.
5. coarse or vulgar.
v.t.
6. to misuse (anything sacred or holy); defile; debase.
[1350–1400; (adj.) Middle English < Latin profānus secular, sacrilegious]
pro•fane′ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

profane


Past participle: profaned
Gerund: profaning

Imperative
profane
profane
Present
I profane
you profane
he/she/it profanes
we profane
you profane
they profane
Preterite
I profaned
you profaned
he/she/it profaned
we profaned
you profaned
they profaned
Present Continuous
I am profaning
you are profaning
he/she/it is profaning
we are profaning
you are profaning
they are profaning
Present Perfect
I have profaned
you have profaned
he/she/it has profaned
we have profaned
you have profaned
they have profaned
Past Continuous
I was profaning
you were profaning
he/she/it was profaning
we were profaning
you were profaning
they were profaning
Past Perfect
I had profaned
you had profaned
he/she/it had profaned
we had profaned
you had profaned
they had profaned
Future
I will profane
you will profane
he/she/it will profane
we will profane
you will profane
they will profane
Future Perfect
I will have profaned
you will have profaned
he/she/it will have profaned
we will have profaned
you will have profaned
they will have profaned
Future Continuous
I will be profaning
you will be profaning
he/she/it will be profaning
we will be profaning
you will be profaning
they will be profaning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been profaning
you have been profaning
he/she/it has been profaning
we have been profaning
you have been profaning
they have been profaning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been profaning
you will have been profaning
he/she/it will have been profaning
we will have been profaning
you will have been profaning
they will have been profaning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been profaning
you had been profaning
he/she/it had been profaning
we had been profaning
you had been profaning
they had been profaning
Conditional
I would profane
you would profane
he/she/it would profane
we would profane
you would profane
they would profane
Past Conditional
I would have profaned
you would have profaned
he/she/it would have profaned
we would have profaned
you would have profaned
they would have profaned
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.profane - corrupt morally or by intemperance or sensuality; "debauch the young people with wine and women"; "Socrates was accused of corrupting young men"; "Do school counselors subvert young children?"; "corrupt the morals"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
carnalise, sensualise, sensualize, carnalize - debase through carnal gratification
infect - corrupt with ideas or an ideology; "society was infected by racism"
lead astray, lead off - teach immoral behavior to; "It was common practice to lead off the young ones, and teach them bad habits"
poison - spoil as if by poison; "poison someone's mind"; "poison the atmosphere in the office"
suborn - incite to commit a crime or an evil deed; "He suborned his butler to cover up the murder of his wife"
2.profane - violate the sacred character of a place or language; "desecrate a cemetery"; "violate the sanctity of the church"; "profane the name of God"
assail, assault, set on, attack - attack someone physically or emotionally; "The mugger assaulted the woman"; "Nightmares assailed him regularly"
Adj.1.profane - characterized by profanity or cursingprofane - characterized by profanity or cursing; "foul-mouthed and blasphemous"; "blue language"; "profane words"
dirty - (of behavior or especially language) characterized by obscenity or indecency; "dirty words"; "a dirty old man"; "dirty books and movies"; "boys telling dirty jokes"; "has a dirty mouth"
2.profane - not concerned with or devoted to religion; "sacred and profane music"; "secular drama"; "secular architecture", "children being brought up in an entirely profane environment"
earthly - of or belonging to or characteristic of this earth as distinguished from heaven; "earthly beings"; "believed that our earthly life is all that matters"; "earthly love"; "our earthly home"
impious - lacking piety or reverence for a god
worldly, secular, temporal - characteristic of or devoted to the temporal world as opposed to the spiritual world; "worldly goods and advancement"; "temporal possessions of the church"
sacred - concerned with religion or religious purposes; "sacred texts"; "sacred rites"; "sacred music"
3.profane - not holy because unconsecrated or impure or defiledprofane - not holy because unconsecrated or impure or defiled
unhallowed, unholy - not hallowed or consecrated
4.profane - grossly irreverent toward what is held to be sacred; "blasphemous rites of a witches' Sabbath"; "profane utterances against the Church"; "it is sacrilegious to enter with shoes on"
irreverent - showing lack of due respect or veneration; "irreverent scholars mocking sacred things"; "noisy irreverent tourists"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

profane

adjective
2. crude, foul, obscene, abusive, coarse, filthy, vulgar, blasphemous a campaign against suggestive and profane lyrics in country songs
3. secular, lay, temporal, unholy, worldly, unconsecrated, unhallowed, unsanctified Churches should not be used for profane or secular purposes.
verb
1. desecrate, violate, abuse, prostitute, contaminate, pollute, pervert, misuse, debase, defile, vitiate, commit sacrilege They have profaned the traditions of the Church.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

profane

adjective
1. Showing irreverence and contempt for something sacred:
2. Not religious in subject matter, form, or use:
3. Offensive to accepted standards of decency:
Slang: raunchy.
verb
To spoil or mar the sanctity of:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

profane

[prəˈfeɪn]
A. ADJ
1. (= secular) → profano
2. (= irreverent) [person, language] → blasfemo
B. VTprofanar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

profane

[prəˈfeɪn] adj
(= obscene) → profane
profane language → obscénités fpl
(= lay, secular) → profane
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

profane

adj
(= irreverent, sacrilegious)(gottes)lästerlich; don’t be profanelästere nicht; to use profane languagegotteslästerlich fluchen, lästern; a profane expressioneine Gotteslästerung
(= secular)weltlich, profan
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

profane

[prəˈfeɪn]
1. adj
a. (secular) → profano/a
b. (irreverent) → irriverente; (language) → sacrilego/a
2. vtprofanare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It was then that you took body in my imagination and that my mind seized on a definite form of you for all its adorations - for its profanations, too.
I have always thought love the only foundation of happiness in a married state, as it can only produce that high and tender friendship which should always be the cement of this union; and, in my opinion, all those marriages which are contracted from other motives are greatly criminal; they are a profanation of a most holy ceremony, and generally end in disquiet and misery: for surely we may call it a profanation to convert this most sacred institution into a wicked sacrifice to lust or avarice: and what better can be said of those matches to which men are induced merely by the consideration of a beautiful person, or a great fortune?
But, had she attempted it, perhaps the old recollections, the long-repressed feelings of childhood, youth, and womanhood, might have gushed from her heart, in words that it would have been profanation to utter there.
Some of her old friends, principally to be found among the peachy-cheeked charmers with the skeleton throats, did once occasionally say, as they toyed in a ghastly manner with large fans--like charmers reduced to flirting with grim death, after losing all their other beaux--did once occasionally say, when the world assembled together, that they wondered the ashes of the Dedlocks, entombed in the mausoleum, never rose against the profanation of her company.
It seems like profanation to laugh and jest and bandy the frivolous chat of our day amid its hoary relics.
"Waxen dolls!" interrupted Obed; "it is profanation, in the view of the arts, to liken the miserable handy-work of the dealers in wax to the pure models of antiquity!"
Bullfrog scarcely rebuked me for the profanation. Emboldened by her indulgence, I threw back the calash from her polished brow, and suffered my fingers, white and delicate as her own, to stray among those dark and glossy curls which realized my daydreams of rich hair.
He heard me talk of the newspaper story of the murder of my father--I say, he heard me talk of it composedly, talk of it carelessly, in the innocent belief that it was the murder of a stranger--and he never opened his lips to prevent that horrid profanation! He never even said, speak of something else; I won't hear you!
With a feeling as of profanation she again seized the offending photograph and flung it across the room into a corner.
His voice sounded thin and futile after the other's, and to Jurgis it seemed a profanation. Why should any one else speak, after that miraculous man--why should they not all sit in silence?
"My nature revolts at such profanation, sir--I will take $75,000 with Miss Julia, and say no more about it."
This holiest of spots was defended from profanation by the strictest edicts of the all-pervading 'taboo', which condemned to instant death the sacrilegious female who should enter or touch its sacred precincts, or even so much as press with her feet the ground made holy by the shadows that it cast.