profaneness


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.profaneness - an attitude of irreverence or contempt for a divinity
irreverence - an irreverent mental attitude
2.profaneness - unholiness by virtue of being profaneprofaneness - unholiness by virtue of being profane
unholiness - the quality of being unholy
sacrilegiousness - profaneness by virtue of committing sacrilege

profaneness

noun
References in classic literature ?
My mind shudders when I think of her awful, awful situation, and that, near as she is to the grave, she should be so given up to vanity, licentiousness, profaneness, and folly.
The growing indignation was voiced from time to time in published protests, of which the last, in 1698, was the over-zealous but powerful 'Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage' by Jeremy Collier, which carried the more weight because the author was not a Puritan but a High-Church bishop and partisan of the Stuarts.
But I did feel that if at that moment any of those faults had been brought before me which sometimes occur amongst us; had I heard that any of you had been guilty of falsehood, or of drunkenness, or of any other such sin; had I heard from any quarter the language of profaneness, or of unkindness, or of indecency; had I heard or seen any signs of that wretched folly which courts the laugh of fools by affecting not to dread evil and not to care for good, then the unsuitableness of any of these things with the scene I had just quitted would indeed have been most intensely painful.
In the author's own words, libertines or practical atheists are "detestable creatures" guilty of vice and profaneness, the doctrine of Epicurus is "monstrous and extravagant beyond all other follies" (2:310), and Spinozism is a manifestation of atheism or superstition--two phenomena arising from the "same defect in the mind of man" (2:312).
If it could be said with as little appearance of profaneness, as there is feeling or intention in my mind, I might affirm: that I had been crucified, dead, and buried, descended into Hell, and am now, I humbly trust, rising again, tho' slowly and gradually.
Profaneness in my head, Defects and darknesse in my breast, A noise of passions ringing me for dead Unto a place where is no rest: Poore priest thus am I drest (6-10)
174; John Disney, A View of Ancient Laws, Against Immorality and Profaneness (Cambridge, 1729), p.
in 1666, when, in the panic atmosphere after the Great Fire and Great Plague, a Bill against Atheism and Profaneness was introduced in the Commons, and the committee to which it was sent was empowered to receive information and report to the House on books tending to atheism, blasphemy, and profaneness, including by name "the book of Mr Hobbes called Leviathan.
This desire is for a vital or higher existence that may offer a contrast to the profaneness of a soul-numbing finitude.
On the page following the rhymes, there is a single sentence-in the smaller, more cramped, hand Tennyson used for his own thoughts-in which he seems to be reflecting upon what the copying-out of the rhymes has taught him-about the "folk" world and perhaps about himself: "how often in one mind" he writes, "co-exist extremes of profaneness and refinement.
He certainly did not subscribe to the strictures of Jeremy Collier, the theatre critic and clergyman who published a pamphlet in 1698 entitled A Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage, the Introduction to which starts: