progradation


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progradation

(ˌprəʊɡrəˈdeɪʃən)
n
(Physical Geography) (of shore or shoreline) the advance seawards due to the build up of sediment
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This bioclastic sandy limestone facies represents the inner ramp facies, which mark the progradation sequence after the maximum rise within topmost facies of the Chichali Formation (Fig.
Surveys during the 2000s suggested progradation of the offshore boundary off New York and an expansion of the population on Georges Bank (NEFSC 2013, 2017).
Ponten & Plink-Bjorklund (2007) advocated that there was a change from the progradation to aggradation from the lower to the upper part of the Gauja RS, coupled with a decrease in tidal influence and a decrease in the coarsegrained sediment input.
During the peak of this glacial episode (LGM), the progradation of the glacier towards the west was accompanied by the deposition of 40 m-thick ground moraines with a high clay content.
(2012): Footwall progradation in syn-rift carbonate platform slope systems (Early Jurassic, Northern Apennines, Italy).
In the Albian- Cenomanian, a relative fall in the base level favored the progradation of deltaic and littoral sands - Une formation (Fabre, 1983; Sarmiento-Rojas et al., 2006).
Specimen assemblages variously composed of freshwater, freshwater-tolerant, brackish, and marine taxa indicate mixing on a floodplain with limited sediment accumulation through deltaic progradation or river avulsion as, in part, envisaged by Ludvigson and Witzke (14).
We attribute this change to the progradation of a megafan-like wedge of sediment from the Caledonia Highlands that caused differential loading, trapping of coarse-grained clastics in proximal areas, rapid salt withdrawal, and pronounced uplift of the Minudie Anticline diapir.
Regarding the effects on the Amazonian coastal region, Muehe and Neves (1995) suggest that progradation of tide into the low elevation rivers such as those in northern Brazil will reflect mangrove loss resulting from coastal erosion.
The best known model of avulsion processes on alluvial floodplains is "avulsion by progradation," where levee breaching and the development of crevasse splays encourage the gradual development of a new channel system by downstream progradation [159, 166].