prohibition

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Related to prohibitionary: probationary, Probationary Period

pro·hi·bi·tion

 (prō′ə-bĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of prohibiting or the condition of being prohibited.
2. A rule or law that forbids something.
3.
a. The forbidding by law of the manufacture, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages.
b. Prohibition The period (1920-1933) during which the 18th Amendment forbidding the manufacture, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages was in force in the United States.

prohibition

(ˌprəʊɪˈbɪʃən)
n
1. the act of prohibiting or state of being prohibited
2. an order or decree that prohibits
3. (Historical Terms) (sometimes capital) (esp in the US) a policy of legally forbidding the manufacture, transportation, sale, or consumption of alcoholic beverages except for medicinal or scientific purposes
4. (Law) law an order of a superior court (in Britain the High Court) forbidding an inferior court to determine a matter outside its jurisdiction
ˌprohiˈbitionary adj

Prohibition

(ˌprəʊɪˈbɪʃən)
n
(Historical Terms) the period (1920–33) when the manufacture, sale, and transportation of intoxicating liquors was banned by constitutional amendment in the US
ˌProhiˈbitionist n

pro•hi•bi•tion

(ˌproʊ əˈbɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act of prohibiting.
2.
a. the legal prohibiting of the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcoholic beverages.
b. (usu. cap.) the period (1920–33) during which such prohibition was in effect in the U.S.
3. a law or decree that forbids.

Prohibition

1920–33 legislation prohibiting the sale of alcohol which led to illicit sales and gangsterism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prohibition - a law forbidding the sale of alcoholic beveragesprohibition - a law forbidding the sale of alcoholic beverages; "in 1920 the 18th amendment to the Constitution established prohibition in the US"
law - legal document setting forth rules governing a particular kind of activity; "there is a law against kidnapping"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.prohibition - a decree that prohibits somethingprohibition - a decree that prohibits something  
decree, fiat, edict, rescript, order - a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge); "a friend in New Mexico said that the order caused no trouble out there"
banning-order - an order that bans something
cease and desist order, enjoining, enjoinment, injunction - (law) a judicial remedy issued in order to prohibit a party from doing or continuing to do a certain activity; "injunction were formerly obtained by writ but now by a judicial order"
interdict, interdiction - a court order prohibiting a party from doing a certain activity
3.prohibition - the period from 1920 to 1933 when the sale of alcoholic beverages was prohibited in the United States by a constitutional amendmentprohibition - the period from 1920 to 1933 when the sale of alcoholic beverages was prohibited in the United States by a constitutional amendment
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
4.prohibition - refusal to approve or assent to
refusal - the act of refusing
interdiction - authoritative prohibition
banning, forbiddance, forbidding, ban - an official prohibition or edict against something
5.prohibition - the action of prohibiting or inhibiting or forbidding (or an instance thereof); "they were restrained by a prohibition in their charter"; "a medical inhibition of alcoholic beverages"; "he ignored his parents' forbiddance"
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"

prohibition

prohibition

noun
Translations
قانون يَمْنَعمَنْع
zákaz
forbud
eltiltás
bann
禁止禁止法
prepoved
yasakyasaklama

prohibition

[ˌprəʊɪˈbɪʃən] Nprohibición f
Prohibition (US) → la ley seca, la Prohibición

prohibition

[ˌprəʊɪˈbɪʃən] nprohibition f
a prohibition on sth → une interdiction de qch
a prohibition on discrimination → une interdiction de la discrimination
prohibition against sth → interdiction de qch

prohibition

n
Verbot nt; the prohibition of alcoholdas Alkoholverbot
(the) Prohibition (US Hist) → die Prohibition; the Prohibition era (US Hist) → die Prohibitionszeit

prohibition

[ˌprəʊɪˈbɪʃn] nproibizione f, divieto
Prohibition (esp Am) (of alcohol) → proibizionismo

prohibit

(prəˈhibit) verb
to forbid. Smoking is prohibited.
prohibition (prəuiˈbiʃən) noun
1. the act of prohibiting. We demand the prohibition by the government of the sale of this drug.
2. a rule, law etc forbidding something. The headmaster issued a prohibition against bringing knives into school.
References in periodicals archive ?
prohibitionary policies that created such a premium for these drugs, because of the risk involved, that you literally had kids--little kids, 12-year-olds, 13-year-olds--who were willing to kill or die to bring those drugs over, or facilitate it, or help maintain control of that crossing in Juarez.
This text poses the issue of the relation between drugs, crimes and violence, based on two dimensions discussed in the literature: that of individual practices and the structural systemic of drug traffic and the effects of prohibitionary policies.
On this prohibitionary aspect of activity rules, there are similarities with ethical rules as discussed herein.
2) For this novel, however, the prohibitionary discourse of reception has a later stage, more a matter of academic literary historians who in their account and evaluation of the novel's state censorship often attribute a marginality onto Sleeveless Errand parallel to the government's interdiction; for example, Parkes notes that, while the novel's 1929 suppression "created some public interest, this novel did not bear on the evolution of modernism" (xi).
Second, the demand for citizens to enjoy after September 11th did not preclude a series of measures that were fundamentally inquisitive and regulatory (greatly expanded powers of surveillance, establishment of databases of personal information), if not precisely prohibitionary or restrictive.
As a corporeal apostrophe, it is reminiscent of an undifferentiated materiality that has been shunned from the sphere of the social in the prohibitionary, "founding," acts of its establishment (69).
Perhaps engaging in religious activities, independent of prohibitionary tenets, results in the adoption of healthy lifestyle choices and coping mechanisms, which is consistent with other studies that address the beneficial effects of religious coping (Pargament, 1997).