prohibitionism


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pro·hi·bi·tion·ist

 (prō′ə-bĭsh′ə-nĭst)
n.
1. One in favor of outlawing the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages.
2. often Prohibitionist A member or supporter of the Prohibition Party.

pro′hi·bi′tion·ism n.

prohibitionism

1. the principles governing the forbidding by law of the manufacture or sale of alcoholic beverages.
2. the interdiction itself. — prohibitionist, n. — Prohibition, n.
See also: Alcohol
Translations

prohibitionism

[ˌprəʊɪˈbɪʃənɪzəm] Nprohibicionismo m

prohibitionism

nProhibition f
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References in periodicals archive ?
Internationally, there's been an important shift away from prohibitionism, allowing cannabis to be used for both medical and recreational purposes.
Not surprisingly, you don't entertain an end to the current regime of labor prohibitionism against low-skilled workers by reviving the Bracero guest worker program with Mexico, the only effective way of stanching the future flow of illegal immigrants.
We should be flexible to change that which has not yielded results, the paradigm based essentially in prohibitionism," he said, saying that it "has not been able to limit production, trafficking nor the global consumption of drugs.
There is broad consensus on three main types of national prostitution policy regimes: prohibitionism, which criminalises all parties involved in prostitution; regulationism, which criminalises the coercive exploitation of sex workers but regulates the consensual provision of sexual services and the employment of sex workers; and, abolitionism, where the provision of sexual services is not criminalised, for the sake of not punishing individuals in prostitution--conceptualised as victims of gender violence and inequality--but the profiting from the prostitution of others, however, is.
Critical exceptionalism operates against a backdrop of prohibitionism.
There are those Americans who view the so-called "war on drugs" as Christianity's most recent attempt to push moral prohibitionism on the masses.
Nor does he entertain the thought that, as a political cause, gay marriage might be less like Civil Rights than like, say, 20th-century prohibitionism or the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s--an ideological fad liable to burn itself out.
12) The International Reform Bureau was very active in Prohibitionism, see "Proposed Federal Film Censorship: International Reform Bureau Sponsors Bill to Create and Interstate Commission," New York Times, 18 March 1921; the proposed legislation included, in article (g), the exclusion by producers and exhibitors of films "with scenes which show the use of narcotics and other unnatural [sic] practices dangerous to social morality.
Prohibitionism and, by implication, the oppression paradigm have been challenged by some international bodies as well.
Aspects of Prohibitionism in Ontario in the 1890s" in Donald Swainson, ed, Oliver Mowat's Ontario (Toronto: Macmillan, 1972) at 156-157.
Voluntary teetotallers objected to the coercive principles of prohibitionism, while prohibitionists castigated the 'peddling legislation' favoured by those who sought to strengthen licensing without banning drink altogether.