prolative


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prolative

(prəʊˈleɪtɪv)
adj
(Grammar) grammar functioning to complete the predicate
References in periodicals archive ?
The only difference can be seen in the prolative case, which has an additional prothetic vowel e.
In 2014, we attested two more forms, involving -n plus prolative and terminative suffixes.
The inessive and illative forms are the most productive ones, while the terminative and prolative forms occur rarely and are not accepted by all speakers.
There are six of them: fasi ablative, uri allative, purpose, bii comitative, suli prolative ('along', 'about', as in 'speak about something'), faafi superior ('on (top of)', 'above', 'over'), confective ('with', as in 'go with/ holding something'), 'concerning, with regard to', and qani a "general", multi-purpose preposition, which has instrument marking among its functions.
Thus we can observe an affinity between the two tables (3a-b): the non-finite patterns although preferring an illative formative in the literary language, demonstrate a dialect translative counterpart to parallel the noun-derivation practice attested for adpositions, and the local cases locative, ablative and prolative are attested in both the non-finite morphology and the four-case pattern of this adverb/adposition type.
The few remains of an erstwhile predominant locative function of modern Irish le are paralleled by similarly relic-like locative readings -- perlative, prolative, or the like -- of other relators such as, for example, English with and Icelandic med (Kress 1982: 205).
On the other hand, locative, as it is to be understood here, covers a variety of spatial senses ranging from inessive via ablative to prolative, etc.