prominence

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prom·i·nence

 (prŏm′ə-nəns)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being prominent.
2. Something prominent, especially an area of land raised above its surroundings.
3. Anatomy A small projection or protuberance.
4. Astronomy A tonguelike cloud of luminous gas rising from the sun's surface, visible as part of the corona during a total solar eclipse.

prominence

(ˈprɒmɪnəns)
n
1. the state or quality of being prominent
2. something that is prominent, such as a protuberance
3. relative importance or consequence
4. (Astronomy) astronomy an eruption of incandescent gas from the sun's surface that can reach an altitude of several hundred thousand kilometres. Prominences are visible during a total eclipse. When viewed in front of the brighter solar disc, they are called filaments

prom•i•nence

(ˈprɒm ə nəns)

n.
1. Also, prom′i•nen•cy. the state of being prominent; conspicuousness.
2. something that is prominent; a projection or protuberance: a prominence high over a ravine.
3. an eruption of a flamelike tongue of relatively cool, high-density gas from the solar chromosphere into the corona.
[1590–1600; < Latin]

prom·i·nence

(prŏm′ə-nəns)
A tongue-like cloud of flaming gas that erupts from the surface of the sun.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prominence - the state of being prominent: widely known or eminent
standing - social or financial or professional status or reputation; "of equal standing"; "a member in good standing"
limelight, public eye, spotlight, glare - a focus of public attention; "he enjoyed being in the limelight"; "when Congress investigates it brings the full glare of publicity to the agency"
salience, saliency, strikingness - the state of being salient
obscurity - an obscure and unimportant standing; not well known; "he worked in obscurity for many years"
2.prominence - relative importance
importance - the quality of being important and worthy of note; "the importance of a well-balanced diet"
3.prominence - something that bulges out or is protuberant or projects from its surroundingsprominence - something that bulges out or is protuberant or projects from its surroundings; "the gun in his pocket made an obvious bulge"; "the hump of a camel"; "he stood on the rocky prominence"; "the occipital protuberance was well developed"; "the bony excrescence between its horns"
frontal eminence - either prominence of the frontal bone above each orbit
occipital protuberance - prominence on the outer surface of the occipital bone
belly - a part that bulges deeply; "the belly of a sail"
caput - a headlike protuberance on an organ or structure; "the caput humeri is the head of the humerus which fits into a cavity in the scapula"
mogul - a bump on a ski slope
nub, nubble - a small lump or protuberance
snag - a sharp protuberance
wart - any small rounded protuberance (as on certain plants or animals)
projection - any solid convex shape that juts out from something

prominence

noun
1. fame, name, standing, rank, reputation, importance, celebrity, distinction, prestige, greatness, eminence, pre-eminence, notability, outstandingness He came to prominence during the World Cup in Italy.
2. conspicuousness, weight, precedence, top billing, specialness, salience, markedness Many papers give prominence to reports of the latest violence.
3. protrusion, swelling, projection, bulge, jutting, protuberance Birds have a prominence on the breast bone called a keel.

prominence

noun
1. A position of exalted widely recognized importance:
2. A natural land elevation:
Translations
بُروز، نُتوء، شُهْرَه
důležitost
fremtrædende stilling
kiemelkedés
mikilvægi, fremd
ünlülük

prominence

[ˈprɒmɪnəns] N
1. (= importance) → importancia f
to bring sth/sb to prominencehacer que algo/algn destaque or resalte
to come (in)to or rise to prominence [idea, subject] → adquirir importancia; [person] → empezar a ser conocido
he came to prominence in the Cuba affairse le empezó a conocer cuando lo de Cuba
to give prominence to sthhacer que algo destaque or resalte
2. (= conspicuousness) → prominencia f
it was set in bold type to give it prominencepara que destacara, aparecía en negrita
3. (= hill) → prominencia f

prominence

[ˈprɒmɪnəns] n
(= celebrity) to gain prominence → se rendre célèbre
to rise to prominence → se hisser au premier plan
to come to prominence → se mettre en évidence
He came to prominence during the World Cup in Italy → Il s'est mis en évidence pendant la Coupe du Monde en Italie.
(= importance) → place f de premier plan
positions of prominence and power → des postes d'influence et de pouvoir
to give prominence to sth → accorder une place de premier plan à qch
Crime prevention had to be given more prominence → On doit accorder plus d'importance à la prévention de la criminalité.

prominence

n
no pl the prominence of his cheekbones/eyesseine ausgeprägten Wangenknochen/Augen; because of the prominence of the castle in the middle of the citywegen der exponierten Lage des Schlosses inmitten der Stadt
(of ideas, beliefs)Beliebtheit f; (of writer, politician etc)Bekanntheit f; the undisputed prominence of his position as …seine unbestritten führende Position als …; if you give too much prominence to any one particular aspectwenn Sie einen bestimmten Aspekt zu sehr in den Vordergrund stellen; to bring somebody/something (in)to prominence (= attract attention to)jdn/etw herausstellen or in den Vordergrund rücken; (= make famous)jdn/etw berühmt machen; he came or rose to prominence in the Cuba affairer wurde durch die Kuba-Affäre bekannt
(= prominent part)Vorsprung m

prominence

[ˈprɒmɪnəns] n (of ridge) → prominenza; (conspicuousness) → imponenza; (of role) → importanza
to come into prominence (person) → venire alla ribalta

prominent

(ˈprominənt) adjective
1. standing out; projecting. prominent front teeth.
2. easily seen. The tower is a prominent landmark.
3. famous. a prominent politician.
ˈprominently adverb
ˈprominence noun

prom·i·nence

n. prominencia, proyección;
pop. bulto.

prominence

n prominencia; bony — prominencia ósea
References in classic literature ?
The light, on a level with her chin, drew out of the darkness her puckered throat and the projecting wrist of the hand that clutched the quilt, and deepened fantastically the hollows and prominences of her high-boned face under its ring of crimping-pins.
Its surface is dotted all over with little conical prominences, looking not unlike the knobs, on an antiquated church door.
This fertile and sheltered tract of country, in which the fields are never brown and the springs never dry, is bounded on the south by the bold chalk ridge that embraces the prominences of Hambledon Hill, Bulbarrow, Nettlecombe-Tout, Dogbury, High Stoy, and Bubb Down.
There was a singular prominence about his bearded chin which marked a man who was not to be easily turned from his purpose.
I have often said to my friends that if I can use whatever prominence may have come to me as an instrument with which to do good, I am content to have it.
The latter object, being more successfully depicted by the artist, stood out in far greater prominence than the sacred volume.
As we strolled on, climbing up higher and higher, we were continually bringing neighboring peaks into view and lofty prominence which had been hidden behind lower peaks before; so by and by, while standing before a group of these giants, we looked around for the chalet again; there it was, away down below us, apparently on an inconspicuous ridge in the valley!
Seth's broad shoulders have a slight stoop; his eyes are grey; his eyebrows have less prominence and more repose than his brother's; and his glance, instead of being keen, is confiding and benign.
Whatever profession you looked at, there was a Warburton or an Alardyce, a Millington or a Hilbery somewhere in authority and prominence.
The sudden light upon his face, as he struck a match, seemed to bring into vivid prominence something there, indescribable in words, yet which affected his hearers equally with the low gravity of his speech.
Upon this, a second lady among the company assumed a position of prominence, and answered the young person who had just spoken with a look of mild reproof, and in a tone of benevolent protest.
Among them came a stranger named Pudd'nhead Wilson, and woman named Roxana; and presently the doings of these two pushed up into prominence a young fellow named Tom Driscoll, whose proper place was away in the obscure background.