promisee

(redirected from promisees)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

prom·is·ee

 (prŏm′ĭ-sē′)
n. Law
The party to which a promise is made.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

promisee

(ˌprɒmɪˈsiː)
n
(Law) contract law a person to whom a promise is made. Compare promisor
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.promisee - a person to whom a promise is made
communicator - a person who communicates with others
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Raz seems to argue that what the promisee receives from the promisor--that constitutes the content of the normative assurance that promisors provide to their promisees even when they do not benefit from the promised act--is an opportunity to develop interests in the performance.
The different treatment of direct duress and third-party duress cannot be explained by differences in consent, but it can be readily explained by differences in the promisees' positions to complain.
contracts--in other words, that courts are sympathetic to promisees who
(260) Ian Ayres and Robert Gertner explain that the rule forces promisees who face higher than usual damages to identify themselves, allowing promisors to take special precautions where the added liability justifies it.
Their rights have primacy over the promisee's rights (1) but the promisees have enforceable rights as well.
removes the benefit that promisees derive from the gift-giving activity.
But no one seriously thinks that promisees have a "human right" to have promises kept, or that breaking a promise--even a very important promise on which much depends--constitutes a human rights violation.
From this perspective, promisees not only possess a moral right to performance, but in appropriate cases, they uniquely possess standing to do something about a breach.
promisees as a group--and perhaps the nation as a whole.
(74) Relational contract theory, for example, abandons the rational actor assumption and instead tries to take seriously the real-world experience and behavior of promisees in breach of contract cases.