proneness


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prone

 (prōn)
adj.
1. Lying with the front or face downward.
2. Having a tendency; inclined. Often used in combination: paper that is prone to yellowing; an accident-prone child.
adv.
In a prone manner: The patient was lying prone on the bed.

[Middle English, inclined, disposed, from Latin prōnus, leaning forward; see per in Indo-European roots.]

prone′ly adv.
prone′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proneness - being disposed to do something; "accident proneness"
disposition - a natural or acquired habit or characteristic tendency in a person or thing; "a swelling with a disposition to rupture"

proneness

noun
Translations

proneness

[ˈprəʊnnɪs] Npropensión f, predisposición f (to a)

proneness

nNeigung f(to zu)
References in classic literature ?
In the affair of love, which, out of strict conformity with the Stoic philosophy, we shall here treat as a disease, this proneness to relapse is no less conspicuous.
The wandering whites who mingle for any length of time with the savages have invariably a proneness to adopt savage habitudes; but none more so than the free trappers.
In Hester Prynne's instance, however, as not unfrequently in other cases, her sentence bore that she should stand a certain time upon the platform, but without undergoing that gripe about the neck and confinement of the head, the proneness to which was the most devilish characteristic of this ugly engine.
Hitherto, though I saw the old lady had her defects (of which one was a proneness to proclaim her perfections), I had always been wishful to excuse them, and to give her credit for all the virtues she professed, and even imagine others yet untold.
The honest man who had expended the sweat of his brow became uneasy, and began to complain with bitterness of the proneness of mankind to cheat him--him invested with the dignity of Labour!
An unwarranted confidence in the sanctity of its apostles--a proneness to regard them as incapable of guile--and an impatience of the least suspicion to their rectitude as men or Christians, have ever been prevailing faults in the Church.
I was so fearful of this at first, that I humbled myself to intimate to him, in private, my apprehensions of Arthur's proneness to these excesses, and to express a hope that he would not encourage it.
First, transition proneness represents "a single underlying pattern or vulnerability to deviance [and] is assumed to characterize individuals who use different classes of drugs or participate in ...
The main idea of work [16] is predicting the SDC proneness of a program's data firstly, then selectively protects the most SDC-prone instructions of the program for the user-specified overhead bound.
Titled "How guilt/shame proneness and coping styles are related to music performance anxiety and stress symptoms by gender," (1) this study surveyed 399 vocal and instrumental education students training in six university music education departments and conservatories in Turkey.
In a November 1 report, the global debt watcher said the Philippines' proneness to natural disasters has fuelled demand for catastrophic loss coverage.