propagate

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prop·a·gate

 (prŏp′ə-gāt′)
v. prop·a·gat·ed, prop·a·gat·ing, prop·a·gates
v.tr.
1. To cause (an organism) to multiply or breed.
2. To breed (offspring).
3. To transmit (characteristics) from one generation to another.
4. To cause to extend to a broader area or larger number; spread: missionaries who propagate the faith.
5. To make widely known; publicize: propagate a rumor.
6. Physics To cause (a wave, for example) to move in some direction or through a medium; transmit.
v.intr.
1. To have offspring; multiply.
2. To extend to a broader area or larger number; spread.
3. Physics To move through a medium.

[Latin prōpāgāre, prōpāgāt-; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

prop′a·ga·ble (-gə-bəl) adj.
prop′a·ga′tive adj.
prop′a·ga′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

propagate

(ˈprɒpəˌɡeɪt)
vb
1. (Biology) biology to reproduce or cause to reproduce; breed
2. (Horticulture) (tr) horticulture to produce (plants) by layering, grafting, cuttings, etc
3. (tr) to promulgate; disseminate
4. (General Physics) physics to move through, cause to move through, or transmit, esp in the form of a wave: to propagate sound.
5. (Genetics) (tr) to transmit (characteristics) from one generation to the next
[C16: from Latin propāgāre to increase (plants) by cuttings, from propāgēs a cutting, from pangere to fasten]
ˌpropaˈgation n
ˌpropaˈgational adj
ˈpropagative adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

prop•a•gate

(ˈprɒp əˌgeɪt)

v. -gat•ed, -gat•ing. v.t.
1. to cause (an organism) to multiply by any process of natural reproduction from the parent stock.
2. to reproduce (itself, its kind, etc.), as an organism does.
3. to transmit (hereditary features or elements) to or through offspring.
4. to spread (a report, doctrine, practice, etc.) from person to person; disseminate.
5. to cause to increase in number or amount.
v.i.
6. to multiply by any process of natural reproduction, as organisms; breed.
7. (of electromagnetic waves, compression waves, etc.) to travel through space or a physical medium.
[1560–70; < Latin propāgātus, past participle of propāgāre to reproduce (a plant) by cuttings, propagate, enlarge, v. derivative of propāgēs scion, slip =pro- pro-1 + pāgēs, derivative of pangere to fasten]
prop`a•ga′tion, n.
prop`a•ga′tion•al, adj.
prop′a•ga`tive, adj.
prop′a•ga`tor, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

propagate


Past participle: propagated
Gerund: propagating

Imperative
propagate
propagate
Present
I propagate
you propagate
he/she/it propagates
we propagate
you propagate
they propagate
Preterite
I propagated
you propagated
he/she/it propagated
we propagated
you propagated
they propagated
Present Continuous
I am propagating
you are propagating
he/she/it is propagating
we are propagating
you are propagating
they are propagating
Present Perfect
I have propagated
you have propagated
he/she/it has propagated
we have propagated
you have propagated
they have propagated
Past Continuous
I was propagating
you were propagating
he/she/it was propagating
we were propagating
you were propagating
they were propagating
Past Perfect
I had propagated
you had propagated
he/she/it had propagated
we had propagated
you had propagated
they had propagated
Future
I will propagate
you will propagate
he/she/it will propagate
we will propagate
you will propagate
they will propagate
Future Perfect
I will have propagated
you will have propagated
he/she/it will have propagated
we will have propagated
you will have propagated
they will have propagated
Future Continuous
I will be propagating
you will be propagating
he/she/it will be propagating
we will be propagating
you will be propagating
they will be propagating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been propagating
you have been propagating
he/she/it has been propagating
we have been propagating
you have been propagating
they have been propagating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been propagating
you will have been propagating
he/she/it will have been propagating
we will have been propagating
you will have been propagating
they will have been propagating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been propagating
you had been propagating
he/she/it had been propagating
we had been propagating
you had been propagating
they had been propagating
Conditional
I would propagate
you would propagate
he/she/it would propagate
we would propagate
you would propagate
they would propagate
Past Conditional
I would have propagated
you would have propagated
he/she/it would have propagated
we would have propagated
you would have propagated
they would have propagated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.propagate - transmit from one generation to the next; "propagate these characteristics"
pass on - give to or transfer possession of; "She passed the family jewels on to her daughter-in-law"
2.propagate - travel through the air; "sound and light propagate in this medium"
propagate - transmit; "propagate sound or light through air"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
3.propagate - transmit; "propagate sound or light through air"
channel, channelise, channelize, transmit, transport, transfer - send from one person or place to another; "transmit a message"
propagate - travel through the air; "sound and light propagate in this medium"
4.propagate - become distributed or widespread; "the infection spread"; "Optimism spread among the population"
catch - spread or be communicated; "The fashion did not catch"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
5.propagate - transmit or cause to broaden or spread; "This great civilization was propagated throughout the land"
spread, distribute - distribute or disperse widely; "The invaders spread their language all over the country"
6.propagate - cause to become widely known; "spread information"; "circulate a rumor"; "broadcast the news"
publicize, bare, publicise, air - make public; "She aired her opinions on welfare"
podcast - distribute (multimedia files) over the internet for playback on a mobile device or a personal computer
sow - introduce into an environment; "sow suspicion or beliefs"
circulate, go around, spread - become widely known and passed on; "the rumor spread"; "the story went around in the office"
popularise, popularize, vulgarise, vulgarize, generalise, generalize - cater to popular taste to make popular and present to the general public; bring into general or common use; "They popularized coffee in Washington State"; "Relativity Theory was vulgarized by these authors"
carry, run - include as the content; broadcast or publicize; "We ran the ad three times"; "This paper carries a restaurant review"; "All major networks carried the press conference"
7.propagate - cause to propagate, as by grafting or layering
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
inoculate - insert a bud for propagation
process, treat - subject to a process or treatment, with the aim of readying for some purpose, improving, or remedying a condition; "process cheese"; "process hair"; "treat the water so it can be drunk"; "treat the lawn with chemicals" ; "treat an oil spill"
8.propagate - multiply sexually or asexually
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
procreate, reproduce, multiply - have offspring or produce more individuals of a given animal or plant; "The Bible tells people to procreate"
vegetate - propagate asexually; "The bacterial growth vegetated along"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

propagate

verb
2. produce, generate, engender, increase The easiest way to propagate a vine is to take cuttings.
3. reproduce, breed, multiply, proliferate, beget, procreate Tomatoes rot in order to transmit their seed and propagate the species.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

propagate

verb
1. To bring into existence and foster the development of:
2. To produce sexually or asexually others of one's kind:
3. To make (information) generally known:
Idioms: spread far and wide, spread the word.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
množit sešířit
formeresprede
breiîa út, dreifarækta; æxlast
dauginimasdauginimasispropaguoti
izplatītpavairotpropagandētvairot
rozmnožiť sašíriť
üre mekyaymak

propagate

[ˈprɒpəgeɪt]
A. VTpropagar
B. VIpropagarse
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

propagate

[ˈprɒpəgeɪt] vt
(= disseminate) [+ idea] → propager
[+ plant] → propager
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

propagate

vt
(= reproduce)fortpflanzen
(= disseminate)verbreiten; viewsverbreiten, propagieren
(Phys) sound, wavesfortpflanzen
(Hort) plantvermehren
visich fortpflanzen or vermehren; (views)sich aus- or verbreiten
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

propagate

[ˈprɒpəˌgeɪt]
1. vtpropagare
2. vi (plants, theories) → propagarsi; (birds) → riprodursi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

propagate

(ˈpropəgeit) verb
1. to spread (news etc).
2. to (make plants) produce seeds.
ˌpropaˈgation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

prop·a·gate

v. propagar, diseminar.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Nature's Law prescribes two antagonistic decrees affecting Circular propagation; first, that as the race climbs higher in the scale of development, so development shall proceed at an accelerated pace; second, that in the same proportion, the race shall become less fertile.
In a word, without going over all the journals in the world, there was not a scientific publication, from the Journal of Evangelical Missions to the Revue Algerienne et Coloniale, from the Annales de la Propagation de la Foi to the Church Missionary Intelligencer, that had not something to say about the affair in all its phases.
Now if in this particular science any one would attend to its original seeds, and their first shoot, he would then as in others have the subject perfectly before him; and perceive, in the first place, that it is requisite that those should be joined together whose species cannot exist without each other, as the male and the female, for the business of propagation; and this not through choice, but by that natural impulse which acts both upon plants and animals also, for the purpose of their leaving behind them others like themselves.
The viceroy promised that if I could procure any assistance, he would command in person the fleet and forces raised for the expedition, assuring that he thought he could not employ his life better than in a war so holy, and of so great an importance, to the propagation of the Catholic faith.
Men attach importance only to self-preservation and the propagation of their species.
They measured fifteen feet in height, and 150 to 175 yards long, and their speed of propagation was thirty feet per second.
The Turk hath at hand, for cause of war, the propagation of his law or sect; a quarrel that he may always command.
His way lying through many streets, and the houses not yet being open, he sits down to breakfast on the door-step of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts and gives it a brush when he has finished as an acknowledgment of the accommodation.
This cavity had been left there for the sole purpose of providing a place for the creation and propagation of the Mahar race.
Hence, the cost of production of a workman is restricted, almost entirely, to the means of subsistence that he requires for his maintenance, and for the propagation of his race.
He had looked, moreover, not only at all the pictures, but at all the copies that were going forward around them, in the hands of those innumerable young women in irreproachable toilets who devote themselves, in France, to the propagation of masterpieces, and if the truth must be told, he had often admired the copy much more than the original.
Thence it spread to all corners of the world, and has been of invaluable assistance in the propagation of his sombre faith.