proparoxytone


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proparoxytone

(ˌprəʊpəˈrɒksɪˌtəʊn)
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) (in Ancient Greek) of, relating to, or denoting words having an acute accent on the third syllable from the end
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a proparoxytone word
[C18: from Greek proparoxutonos; see pro-2, paroxytone]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proparoxytone - word having stress or acute accent on the antepenult
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
References in periodicals archive ?
Depending on stress location, words are classified as: (a) oxitone (stress on the last syllable), (b) paroxitone (stress on the penultimate syllable) and, (c) proparoxytone (stress on the antepenultimate syllable) (19-21).
The first verse also presents syntactic packaging, emphasized by the reiteration of the long 4-syllable foot imposed by the three successive proparoxytones ("lampadas electricas da fabrica"); the rhythm functions as super-anapest, with an intrinsic "weak-weakweak-strong" crescendo that adds to the overall impact of the opening).
In order to find out the phonological primes that account for prenuclear F0 rises, recordings were made of one English and one Spanish native speaker producing 45 declarative sentences which contained words with different stress distribution in prenuclear position: oxytones (words with stress on the final syllable and thus no postaccentual syllables within the word), paroxytones (words with stress on the penultimante syllable and thus one postaccentual syllable within the word) and proparoxytones (words with stress on the antepenultimate syllable and thus two postaccentual syllables within the word).
Among the sources are assimilation, compensatory lengthening, stress, sonority, the optimization of syllable contacts, and spontaneous gemination in proparoxytones.
In all but two of these cases of exceptional dialefe the first word is paroxytonic (a parola piana), which supports Beccaria's assertion that dialefe in Dante is prohibited after proparoxytones (parole sdrucciole); the two exceptions, if we wish to keep the accented sixth syllable, are 88 and 89.
In order to determine the status of L after the focal element in the two languages, focal words with different stress distributions were used, namely, oxytones (words with stress on the ultimate syllable), paroxytones (words with stress on the penultimate syllable), and proparoxytones (words with stress on the antepenultimate syllable).
So proparoxytones with a closed penultimate syllable seem to be practically nonexistent, (9) which might suggest at first sight that quantity sensitivity is still active, so no matter whether the system is rule-based or not, made-up words with these syllabic structures are not expected to be stressed on the antepenult.