prophecy

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prophecy

a prediction; the inspired utterance of a prophet: His prophecy was that the world would come to an end soon.
Not to be confused with:
prophesy – to speak as a prophet; to foretell future events: He will prophesy the next world war.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

proph·e·cy

 (prŏf′ĭ-sē)
n. pl. proph·e·cies (-sēz)
1.
a. An inspired utterance of a prophet, viewed as a revelation of divine will.
b. A prediction of the future, made under divine inspiration.
c. Such an inspired message or prediction transmitted orally or in writing.
2. The vocation or condition of a prophet.
3. A prediction.

[Middle English prophecie, from Old French, from Latin prophētīa, from Greek prophēteia, from prophētēs, prophet; see prophet.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prophecy

(ˈprɒfɪsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Theology)
a. a message of divine truth revealing God's will
b. the act of uttering such a message
2. a prediction or guess
3. (Theology) the function, activity, or charismatic endowment of a prophet or prophets
[C13: ultimately from Greek prophētēs prophet]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

proph•e•cy

(ˈprɒf ə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the foretelling or prediction of what is to come.
2. something that is declared by a prophet, esp. a divinely inspired prediction, instruction, or exhortation.
3. any prediction or forecast.
4. the action, function, or faculty of a prophet.
[1175–1225; Middle English prophecie < Old French < Late Latin prophētīa < Greek prophēteía. See prophet, -y3]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prophecy - knowledge of the future (usually said to be obtained from a divine source)prophecy - knowledge of the future (usually said to be obtained from a divine source)
prediction, anticipation, prevision - the act of predicting (as by reasoning about the future)
crystal gazing - staring into a crystal ball to arouse visions of future or distant events
fortune telling, soothsaying, foretelling, divination - the art or gift of prophecy (or the pretense of prophecy) by supernatural means
2.prophecy - a prediction uttered under divine inspiration
forecasting, foretelling, prediction, prognostication - a statement made about the future
oracle - a prophecy (usually obscure or allegorical) revealed by a priest or priestess; believed to be infallible
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

prophecy

noun
1. prediction, forecast, revelation, prognosis, foretelling, prognostication, augury, sortilege, vaticination (rare) Nostradamus's prophecy of the end of the world
2. second sight, divination, augury, telling the future, soothsaying a child born with the gift of prophecy
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

prophecy

noun
Something that is foretold by or as if by supernatural means:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تَكَهُّننُبوءَه
proroctvíprorocký duch
forudsigelseprofetispådom
proročanstvoproroštvo
jóslatprófécia
spáspádómur
pranašautojaspranašavimaspranašiškaipranašiškas
pareģojumspareģošanas spējas
prorocký duchproroctvo
prerokba
gaipten haber vermekehanettahmin

prophecy

[ˈprɒfɪsɪ] Nprofecía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

prophecy

[ˈprɒfɪsi] nprophétie f
to fulfil a prophecy → réaliser une prophétie
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

prophecy

nProphezeiung f; one skilled in the prophecy of the futurejemand, der zukünftige Ereignisse vorhersagen kann or der die Gabe der Prophetie hat
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

prophecy

[ˈprɒfɪsɪ] nprofezia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

prophecy

(ˈprofəsi) plural ˈprophecies noun
1. the power of foretelling the future.
2. something that is foretold. He made many prophecies about the future.
ˈprophesy (-sai) verb
to foretell. He prophesied (that there would be) another war.
ˈprophet (-fit) feminine ˈprophetess noun
1. a person who (believes that he) is able to foretell the future.
2. a person who tells people what God wants, intends etc. the prophet Isaiah.
proˈphetic (-ˈfe-) adjective
proˈphetically adverb

prophecy is a noun: Her prophecy (not prophesy) came true.
prophesy is a verb: to prophesy (not prophecy) the future.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
I MEAN not to speak of divine prophecies; nor of heathen oracles; nor of natural predictions; but only of prophecies that have been of certain memory, and from hidden causes.
The second is, that probable conjectures, or obscure traditions, many times turn themselves into prophecies; while the nature of man, which coveteth divination, thinks it no peril to foretell that which indeed they do but collect.
Pilgrims, always prone to find prophecies in the Bible, and often where none exist, speak cheerfully and complacently of poor, ruined Ephesus as the victim of prophecy.
Those "prophecies" are distinctly leveled at the "churches of Ephesus, Smyrna," etc., and yet the pilgrims invariably make them refer to the cities instead.
Meantime, Gabriel, ascending to the main-royal mast-head, was tossing one arm in frantic gestures, and hurling forth prophecies of speedy doom to the sacrilegious assailants of his divinity.
'There was a Mohammedan regiment lay next to us at the Pirzai Kotal, and a priest of theirs - he was, as I remember, a naik - when the fit was on him, spake prophecies. But the mad all are in God's keeping.
One of the major prophecies in the books is that Cersei will meet her end in the hands of the "Valonqar," which means "little brother" in High Valyrian and the book proves that Jaime was born after her.
According to the worried prelate, when people rely too much on prophecies and fetish priests, a time will come that Ghana will breed a generation who would not appreciate that hard work pays, but will rather go to prophets and the likes who are increasingly telling the masses to come to them for money and other comforts in life.
In a sermon on 31 December, Rev Owusu-Bempah made 18 prophecies for 2019, including the death of either Imam Sharabutu or Ghana's Muslim Vice-President Mahamudu Bawumia.
Biblical prophecies are always favorite topics of discussion not only for Christians but even for skeptics, agnostics, atheists, occultists, and even fortune-tellers.
Three unusual happenings have sparked claims that Biblical prophecies about theend of the worldand the coming of the Messiah may be coming true.
Prophetess Mary Omolara Alarape of Christ Mount Zion Bethel Healing Ministry, Asese, Maba, Ogun State, speaks on what God has declared for 2018, why prophecies don't come true, how to handle domestic violence in marriages, among other issues, in an interaction with TribuneChurch.