prophesy

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prophesy

to speak as a prophet; to foretell future events: He will prophesy the next world war.
Not to be confused with:
prophecy – a prediction; the inspired utterance of a prophet: His prophecy was that the world would come to an end soon.

proph·e·sy

 (prŏf′ĭ-sī′, -sē′)
v. proph·e·sied (-sīd′, -sēd′), proph·e·sy·ing (-sī′ĭng, -sē′ĭng), proph·e·sies (-sīz′, -sēz′)
v.tr.
1. To reveal by divine inspiration.
2. To predict the future with certainty. See Synonyms at foretell.
3. To prefigure or foreshadow: "The wind was in the east, and the clouds prophesied rain" (Jacob Riis).
v.intr.
1. To reveal the will or message of God; speak or write as a prophet.
2. To predict future events; make predictions.

[Middle English prophecien, from Old French prophecier, from prophecie, prophecy; see prophecy.]

proph′e·si′er n.

prophesy

(ˈprɒfɪˌsaɪ)
vb, -sies, -sying or -sied
1. (Theology) to reveal or foretell (something, esp a future event) by or as if by divine inspiration
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (intr) archaic to give instruction in religious subjects
[C14 prophecien, from prophecy]
ˈpropheˌsiable adj
ˈpropheˌsier n

proph•e•sy

(ˈprɒf əˌsaɪ)

v. -sied, -sy•ing. v.t.
1. to foretell or predict.
2. to indicate beforehand.
3. to utter in prophecy.
v.i.
4. to make predictions, esp. by divine inspiration.
5. to speak as a mediator between God and humankind or in God's stead.
[1350–1400; Middle English; v. use of variant of prophecy]
proph′e•si`er, n.
syn: See predict.

prophesy


Past participle: prophesied
Gerund: prophesying

Imperative
prophesy
prophesy
Present
I prophesy
you prophesy
he/she/it prophesies
we prophesy
you prophesy
they prophesy
Preterite
I prophesied
you prophesied
he/she/it prophesied
we prophesied
you prophesied
they prophesied
Present Continuous
I am prophesying
you are prophesying
he/she/it is prophesying
we are prophesying
you are prophesying
they are prophesying
Present Perfect
I have prophesied
you have prophesied
he/she/it has prophesied
we have prophesied
you have prophesied
they have prophesied
Past Continuous
I was prophesying
you were prophesying
he/she/it was prophesying
we were prophesying
you were prophesying
they were prophesying
Past Perfect
I had prophesied
you had prophesied
he/she/it had prophesied
we had prophesied
you had prophesied
they had prophesied
Future
I will prophesy
you will prophesy
he/she/it will prophesy
we will prophesy
you will prophesy
they will prophesy
Future Perfect
I will have prophesied
you will have prophesied
he/she/it will have prophesied
we will have prophesied
you will have prophesied
they will have prophesied
Future Continuous
I will be prophesying
you will be prophesying
he/she/it will be prophesying
we will be prophesying
you will be prophesying
they will be prophesying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been prophesying
you have been prophesying
he/she/it has been prophesying
we have been prophesying
you have been prophesying
they have been prophesying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been prophesying
you will have been prophesying
he/she/it will have been prophesying
we will have been prophesying
you will have been prophesying
they will have been prophesying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been prophesying
you had been prophesying
he/she/it had been prophesying
we had been prophesying
you had been prophesying
they had been prophesying
Conditional
I would prophesy
you would prophesy
he/she/it would prophesy
we would prophesy
you would prophesy
they would prophesy
Past Conditional
I would have prophesied
you would have prophesied
he/she/it would have prophesied
we would have prophesied
you would have prophesied
they would have prophesied
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.prophesy - predict or reveal through, or as if through, divine inspiration
forebode, predict, prognosticate, foretell, promise, anticipate, call - make a prediction about; tell in advance; "Call the outcome of an election"
vaticinate - foretell through or as if through the power of prophecy
irradiate, enlighten - give spiritual insight to; in religion
2.prophesy - deliver a sermon; "The minister is not preaching this Sunday"
evangelise, evangelize - preach the gospel (to)
lecture, talk - deliver a lecture or talk; "She will talk at Rutgers next week"; "Did you ever lecture at Harvard?"

prophesy

verb predict, forecast, divine, foresee, augur, presage, foretell, forewarn, prognosticate, soothsay, vaticinate (rare) She prophesied the Great Fire of London and her own death in 1561.

prophesy

verb
To tell about or make known (future events) by or as if by supernatural means:
Translations
يَتَنَبَّأ
prorokovatvěštit
forudsigespå
proreći
jövendöl
spá, segja fyrir um
veštiť
prerokovati
kehanette bulunmak

prophesy

[ˈprɒfɪsaɪ] VT (= foretell) → profetizar; (= predict) → predecir, vaticinar

prophesy

[ˈprɒfɪsaɪ]
vtprophétiser
viprophétiser

prophesy

prophesy

[ˈprɒfɪˌsaɪ] vtpredire, profetizzare

prophecy

(ˈprofəsi) plural ˈprophecies noun
1. the power of foretelling the future.
2. something that is foretold. He made many prophecies about the future.
ˈprophesy (-sai) verb
to foretell. He prophesied (that there would be) another war.
ˈprophet (-fit) feminine ˈprophetess noun
1. a person who (believes that he) is able to foretell the future.
2. a person who tells people what God wants, intends etc. the prophet Isaiah.
proˈphetic (-ˈfe-) adjective
proˈphetically adverb

prophecy is a noun: Her prophecy (not prophesy) came true.
prophesy is a verb: to prophesy (not prophecy) the future.
References in classic literature ?
For the man that prophesies us bad weather, on the contrary, we entertain only bitter and revengeful thoughts.
Well, play he would; he'd show 'em; even despite the elated prophesies made of how swiftly he would be trimmed--prophesies coupled with descriptions of the bucolic game he would play and of his wild and woolly appearance.
Next Odysseus lies in wait and catches Helenus, who prophesies as to the taking of Troy, and Diomede accordingly brings Philoctetes from Lemnos.
Finally, prophesies. For a prophesy to be valid it needs to be specific about the event and the time of the event.
Neophytos said that he studied the prophesies "on orders from contemporary people of God who told me that a bishop must study the prophesies of the saints," to establish "which are true and which are false," because "we have false ones as well;" these were the work of Satan.
Dror Burstein is fascinated by prophesies of annihilation.
Secondly, we have some prophets of doom that give fake prophesies because of money.
Summary: Fact.MR prophesies the global apparel accessories market to rise at a 4.6% CAGR during the forecast period 2017-2022.
Evidence from historians that Jesus existed, evidence from the Bible of fulfilled prophesies, countless pieces of evidence of God healing today, of answered prayers, of millions of changed lives.
Prophesies are a mug's game, if utterly irresistible.
"Galveston officials are pondering what action to take after a district judge received a book containing the apocalyptic prophesies of polygamist sect leader Warren Jeffs, serving a life sentence for sexually assaulting a child bride." - Galveston judge receives polygamist's prophesies, Houston Chronicle