prophetess


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proph·et·ess

 (prŏf′ĭ-tĭs)
n.
1. A woman who speaks by divine inspiration or as the interpreter through whom the will of a god is expressed.
2. A woman predictor; a woman soothsayer.
3. The chief spokeswoman of a movement or cause. See Usage Note at -ess.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

proph•et•ess

(ˈprɒf ɪ tɪs)

n.
1. a woman who speaks for God or a deity, or by divine inspiration.
2. a woman who foretells the future.
3. a woman who speaks for some doctrine, cause, or movement.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prophetess - a woman prophetprophetess - a woman prophet      
oracle, prophesier, prophet, vaticinator, seer - an authoritative person who divines the future
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

prophetess

noun
A person who foretells future events by or as if by supernatural means:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

prophetess

[ˈprɒfɪtɪs] Nprofetisa f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

prophetess

nProphetin f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

prophetess

[ˈprɒfɪtɪs] nprofetessa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
A prophetess? Yea, I say unto you, and more than a prophetess--a uncommon pretty young woman."
She stood up, straight and stern, and her face, as she looked towards the land, was lit with the fire of the prophetess.
Hannah `felt in her bones' that it was going to be an unusually fine day, and she proved herself a true prophetess, for everybody and everything seemed bound to produce a grand success.
She might, in one of her phases, have been a prophetess. She might, and not improbably would, have suffered death from the stern tribunals of the period, for attempting to undermine the foundations of the Puritan establishment.
"On his way to Perth, the king was met by a Highland woman, calling herself a prophetess; she stood at the side of the ferry by which he was about to travel to the north, and cried with a loud voice, 'My lord the king, if you pass this water you will never return again alive!'"--(VIDE the HISTORY OF SCOTLAND).
Deborah, the prophetess, told Barak to take ten thousand men and sally forth against another King Jabin who had been doing something.
My father turned his back on the prophetess with a smile of contempt.
I am not a prophetess, but I shall venture on a prediction.
"What can I tell you?" Helen reflected, speaking more to herself in a rambling style than as a prophetess delivering a message.
They say that as he was approaching the temple, the prophetess became inspired and said:
Well, Chaerephon, as you know, was very impetuous in all his doings, and he went to Delphi and boldly asked the oracle to tell him whether--as I was saying, I must beg you not to interrupt--he asked the oracle to tell him whether anyone was wiser than I was, and the Pythian prophetess answered, that there was no man wiser.
"Signor Pastrini," returned Franz, "you are more susceptible than Cassandra, who was a prophetess, and yet no one believed her; while you, at least, are sure of the credence of half your audience.