prophetical


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pro·phet·ic

 (prə-fĕt′ĭk) also pro·phet·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Of, belonging to, or characteristic of a prophet or prophecy: prophetic books.
2. Foretelling events as if by divine inspiration: casual words that proved prophetic.

pro·phet′i·cal·ly adv.
pro·phet′i·cal·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.prophetical - foretelling events as if by supernatural intervention; "prophetic writings"; "prophetic powers"; "words that proved prophetic"
References in classic literature ?
Doolittle delivered this prophetical opinion was peculiar to his species.
It has also been broadcast in some other religious holidays during the year, like Be'ethat (the day prophet Mohammad was sent to his prophetical mission), Fathers' Day (in which Imam Ali, the first Moslem saint, was born), or the day the Shia's 12th saint was born.
The Mantle of Elijah: the redaction criticism of the Prophetical Books, The Biblical Seminar 20, Sheffield, 1993; COGGINS, R.
Its prophetical defense of human rights could be credible only when others see it as righteous and merciful.
Norin also describes in detail the well-known increase of YHWH-names in the books of Samuel and Kings and in prophetical books like Jeremiah, while the El-names again become more frequent in the books of Chronicles.
A collection of polemical, historiographical, devotional and prophetical documents produced by the Tuscan dissident Franciscans in last decades of the 14th Century.
De Silva prophetical told, if the former President Rajapaksa and the Sirisena-led SLFP closed ranks.
Likewise prophetical words themselves ground sure and certain knowledge of the veracity of a claim to be a prophet rather than miracles.
Umunna's intentions were, much of his speech has the prophetical feel of Mark Antony's famous Shakespearian tribute to Julius Caesar.
It is only now that men begin to appreciate that divine old man--to sympathize with the prophetical and poetical rhapsody of his ever-memorable words.
This is not necessarily an exaggerated or unlikely notion, since medieval Europe was happy to reinterpret the chemical processes of alchemy along magical or prophetical lines.
In fact, he was one of the first people to join the Society for Psychical Research in hopes that it could provide him with some answers about his prophetical dream.