prophethood

(redirected from prophetship)

proph·et

 (prŏf′ĭt)
n.
1.
a. A person who speaks by divine inspiration or as the interpreter through whom the will of a god is expressed.
b. One of the highest-ranking leaders of the Mormon church, considered by the faithful to be divinely inspired, and responsible for establishing and revising doctrine.
2. A person gifted with profound moral insight and exceptional powers of expression.
3. A predictor; a soothsayer.
4. The chief spokesperson of a movement or cause.
5.
a. Prophets(used with a sing. or pl. verb) The second of the three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures, comprising the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Twelve. Used with the. See Table at Bible.
b. Prophet One of the prophets mentioned in the Bible, especially one believed to be the author of one of these books. Used with the.
6. Prophet Islam Muhammad. Used with the.

[Middle English prophete, from Old French, from Latin prophēta, from Greek prophētēs : pro-, forth; see pro-2 + -phētēs, speaker (from phanai, to speak; see bhā- in Indo-European roots).]

proph′et·hood′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prophethood

(ˈprɒfɪthʊd) or

prophetship

n
(Theology) the state or position of a prophet
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014