prophylaxis


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Related to prophylaxis: oral prophylaxis, Malaria prophylaxis, dental prophylaxis

pro·phy·lax·is

 (prō′fə-lăk′sĭs, prŏf′ə-)
n. pl. pro·phy·lax·es (-lăk′sēz′)
Prevention of or protective treatment for disease.

[New Latin, from Greek prophulaktikos, prophylactic; see prophylactic.]

prophylaxis

(ˌprɒfɪˈlæksɪs)
n
(Medicine) the prevention of disease or control of its possible spread

pro•phy•lax•is

(ˌproʊ fəˈlæk sɪs, ˌprɒf ə-)

n., pl. -lax•es.
1. the prevention of disease, as by protective measures.
2. prophylactic treatment.
[1835–45; < New Latin < Greek prophylak- (see prophylactic) + -sis -sis]

prophylaxis

protection from or prevention of disease. — prophylactic, adj.
See also: Health
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prophylaxis - the prevention of disease
prevention, bar - the act of preventing; "there was no bar against leaving"; "money was allocated to study the cause and prevention of influenza"
Translations
الوقاية

prophylaxis

[ˌprɒfɪˈlæksɪs] Nprofilaxis f

prophylaxis

nProphylaxe f

pro·phy·lax·is

n. profilaxis, medidas para prevenir enfermedades o su propagación.

prophylaxis

n profilaxis f; postexposure — profilaxis postexposición
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings from the ongoing extension study are promising and confirm the data we saw in our pivotal studies, with prolonged dosing intervals of up to 14 days with rIX-FP for routine prophylaxis," said Elena Santagostino, M.
The American Urological Association provides a Best Practice Policy Statement of Urologic Surgery Antimicrobial Prophylaxis.
Researchers also noted an increase in cases of disease caused by clonal complex 17 --which has been associated with invasive disease in neonates --and fewer cases caused by clonal complex 19, as well as a nonsignificant increase in the incidence of invasive Escherichia coli infection after the 1999 implementation of intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis during labor.
Despite evidence of the benefits of VTE prophylaxis, studies of clinical practices worldwide suggest that VTE prophylaxis is underutilised, and implementation of guidelines formulated by the ACCP is inconsistent and inadequate.
This issue of the relative benefits versus the risk of antibiotic prophylaxis led to the first guidelines to establish criteria in which antibiotic prophylaxis might be useful in preventing prosthetic joint infection.
The HPTN 046 protocol, a prospective, randomised placebo-controlled trial looked at the safety and efficacy of nevirapine prophylaxis against HIV transmission in breastmilk, with infants followed up for 18 months.
Pooled individual data analysis of five randomised trials of infant nevirapine prophylaxis to prevent HIV-1 transmission through breastmilk.
Moldwin said that chronic low-dose prophylaxis may be considered when recurring infections are not related to intercourse.
The study showed that in recently immobilized patients, who received usual short-term prophylaxis of 10 days (+/- 4) with the standard of care enoxaparin (Lovenox/Clexane), an additional 28 days (+/- 4) prophylaxis with enoxaparin further reduced the risk of VTE events (2.
After several hundred years of theory development and research by scientists around the world, the American Heart Association (AHA) published the first document recommending prophylaxis against bacterial endocarditis.
Over the past five years, GIANT's main aim has been to develop VTE prophylaxis in Gulf countries, where National epidemiologic registries suggests that much more can be done in this field.
Can cranberry juice be a substitute for cefaclor prophylaxis in children with vesicoureteral reflux?