proprietary name


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

proprietary name

n
(Commerce) a name that is a trademark
Translations

proprietary name

nMarkenname m
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, the Brezza has been given the Auto Gear Shift (AGS) transmission, which is Maruti Suzuki's proprietary name for its AMT gearbox.
Admelog also was granted marketing authorization as a biosimilar, under the proprietary name Insulin lispro Sanofi, by the European Commission in July 2017, Sanofi added.
When his sons Pierre and Joseph took over the business after World War II, they decided to sell their confections under a proprietary name. It was Pierre's wife who suggested Godiva, an association the PR folks have since explained as "timeless values balanced with modern boldness." Lady Godiva came ashore in America in 1966 when Philadelphia's Wanamaker's Department Store began selling its sweets--and teaching suitors that one very good way into his paramour's heart was that gold box.
While generic nomenclature uses a scientific approach, the brand or proprietary name is outcome of more of an art than science.
Do your customers ask for your product by your own proprietary name that you own or by its commodity name (or worse, your competitor's proprietary product name)?
For the pharmaceutical industry, which is always in search of the next blockbuster drug, the proprietary name is invaluable.
Company executives are obviously enthusiastic about the new pair of handguns carrying a famous proprietary name. New president James Debney notes that the Bodyguards "stand out as platforms with cutting-edge performance advancements."
While name brand NiMH rechargeable batteries are quite popular among consumers, they can only be charged using a proprietary name brand NiMH charger.
Confusingly, as is common in Australia, the term 'generic' may be used to refer to any drug marketed under a different proprietary name from that of the innovator product (15).
So at its basic level, a trademark officially and legally registers a proprietary name that implies a promise.
England has its Stilton and Shropshire Blue, among others; France boasts Bleu d'Auvergne and Forme d'Ambert, as well as Roquefort; Cabrales and Valdeon are singular blues from Spain; Danish Blue is a mild, creamy cheese developed since WWI; Germany produces a delicious soft-ripened blue called Cambozola, which, as the proprietary name suggests, combines the body of Camembert with Gorgonzola's zesty blue flavor; Ireland's distinctive Cashel Blue is just starting to become well known here; and of course, Gorgonzola from Italy, one of our most popular blues.
As I have been unable to locate a foliar feed for lawns, I wonder if you could tell me its proprietary name.