propylene


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Related to propylene: propylene glycol, Propylene oxide

pro·pyl·ene

 (prō′pə-lēn′)
n.
A flammable gaseous alkene, C3H6, derived from petroleum hydrocarbon cracking and used in organic synthesis. Also called propene.

propylene

(ˈprəʊpɪˌliːn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) another name for propene
[C19: from propyl + -ene]

pro•pyl•ene

(ˈproʊ pəˌlin)
n.
a colorless, flammable gas, C3H6, of the olefin series: used chiefly in organic synthesis.
[1840–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.propylene - a flammable gas obtained by cracking petroleum; used in organic synthesis
gas - a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The system with a propylene production capacity of 150,000 tons a year is planned to start demonstration tests in fiscal 2009.
The novel catalyst technology reportedly incorporates higher levels of ethylene and results in property combinations not seen in typical Ziegler-Natta or metallocene-based propylene copolymers.
The country's largest petrochemical company PT Chandra Asri Petrochemical Complex (CAPC) said it will increase its production capacity to 600,000 tons for ethylene and to 343,000 tons for propylene a year in 2006 through de- bottlenecking.
Acrylonitrile is produced by reacting propylene and ammonia, both supplied from other Teesside companies, with oxygen from the air.
Nature's Gate is introducing Organics Propylene Glycol-Free Deodorant, one of the first all-natural propylene glycol-free stick deodorants available on the market.
Belgian chemicals and pharmaceuticals group Solvay and German company BASF have signed a partnership agreement for the supply of hydrogen peroxide to produce propylene oxide, according to a press release from Solvay.
The labeling for amprenavir oral solution has been changed because of potential safety concerns with the drug's high propylene glycol content.
This (Research Triangle Institute) report presents a toxicological profile for ethylene glycol and propylene glycol.
(OPC), a private company and one of Egypt's leading textiles producers, has begun work on the construction of a propylene plant in its Alexandria complex.
A blend of polypropylene (PP) and ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) is used in a variety of applications because of its rigidity and low-temperature impact strength (1).
On July 13, 1989, CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) published Current Intelligence Bulletins (CIBs) on propylene oxide [1] and on ethylene oxide [2].
More surprising, he says, is his group's subsequent finding of a similar photochemically induced mutagenicity among the breakdown products of an even smaller organic chemical, propylene (C.sub.3.H.sub.6.).