prosody


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pros·o·dy

 (prŏs′ə-dē)
n. pl. pros·o·dies
1. The study of the metrical structure of verse.
2. A particular system of versification.
3. The set of speech variables, including rhythm, speed, pitch, and relative emphasis, that distinguish vocal patterns.

[Middle English prosodie, from Latin prosōdia, accent, from Greek prosōidiā, song sung to music, accent : pros-, pros- + ōidē, song; see ode.]

pro·sod′ic (prə-sŏd′ĭk) adj.
pro·sod′i·cal·ly adv.
pros′o·dist n.

prosody

(ˈprɒsədɪ)
n
1. (Poetry) the study of poetic metre and of the art of versification, including rhyme, stanzaic forms, and the quantity and stress of syllables
2. (Poetry) a system of versification
3. (Linguistics) the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
[C15: from Latin prosōdia accent of a syllable, from Greek prosōidia song set to music, from pros towards + ōidē, from aoidē song; see ode]
prosodic adj
ˈprosodist n

pros•o•dy

(ˈprɒs ə di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. the science or study of poetic meters and versification.
2. a particular or distinctive system of metrics and versification: Milton's prosody.
3. the stress and intonation patterns of an utterance.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin prosōdia < Greek prosōidía accent of a syllable, modulation of voice, song =pros- toward + ōid(ḗ) ode + -ia -y3]
pro•sod•ic (prəˈsɒd ɪk) pro•sod′i•cal, adj.

prosody

1. the science or study of poetic meters and versification.
2. a particular or distinctive system of metrics and versification, as that of Dylan Thomas. — prosodist, n.prosodie, prosodical, adj.
See also: Verse

prosody

The principles and elements of versification: meter, rhyme, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prosody - the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
manner of speaking, delivery, speech - your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally; "his manner of speaking was quite abrupt"; "her speech was barren of southernisms"; "I detected a slight accent in his speech"
intonation, pitch contour, modulation - rise and fall of the voice pitch
caesura - a break or pause (usually for sense) in the middle of a verse line
enjambement, enjambment - the continuation of a syntactic unit from one line of verse into the next line without a pause
stress, accent, emphasis - the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch); "he put the stress on the wrong syllable"
speech rhythm, rhythm - the arrangement of spoken words alternating stressed and unstressed elements; "the rhythm of Frost's poetry"
2.prosody - (prosody) a system of versification
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
versification - the form or metrical composition of a poem
cadence, metre, meter, measure, beat - (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
sprung rhythm - a poetic rhythm that imitates the rhythm of speech
3.prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versificationprosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
poetics - study of poetic works
acatalectic - (prosody) a line of verse that has the full number of syllables
Alexandrine - (prosody) a line of verse that has six iambic feet
catalectic - (prosody) a line of verse that lacks a syllable in the last metrical foot
hypercatalectic - (prosody) a line of poetry having an extra syllable or syllables at the end of the last metrical foot
poetic rhythm, rhythmic pattern, prosody - (prosody) a system of versification
cadence, metre, meter, measure, beat - (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
metrical foot, metrical unit, foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
iambic - of or consisting of iambs; "iambic pentameter"
dactylic - of or consisting of dactyls; "dactylic meter"
spondaic - of or consisting of spondees; "spondaic hexameter"
trochaic - of or consisting of trochees; "trochaic dactyl"
Translations

prosody

[ˈprɒsədɪ] Nmétrica f

prosody

nVerslehre f

prosody

[ˈprɒsədɪ] nprosodia
References in classic literature ?
He was a master of metre, and contributed certain modifications to the laws of Chinese prosody which exist to the present day.
I taught myself the language, or began to do so, when I knew nothing of the English grammar but the prosody at the end of the book.
Orthography, etymology, syntax, and prosody, biography, astronomy, geography, and general cosmography, the sciences of compound proportion, algebra, land-surveying and levelling, vocal music, and drawing from models, were all at the ends of his ten chilled fingers.
Part 1 explores types and traditions of poetry, such as epic, lyric, and pastoral, while Part 2 covers technical vocabulary, with chapters on form, prosody, rhyme, stanza, and wordplay.
Al-Babtain's spokesperson said in a press release that the first book is "Arabic Prosody and Rhyming" by Dr.
While attention continues to be paid to Swinburne's sadomasochism, the most significant areas of analysis in current Swinburne studies are first and foremost his prosody, followed by Swinburne's relationship to Modernism, and lastly Swinburne's interaction with liberalism.
As for literary terms, Urdu's general dictionaries and technical books written on prosody, grammar and rhetoric served the purpose.
6 April 2018 - US-based investment firm Prosody Investments I, LLC has exited from a joint venture encompassing a portfolio of approximately 100mw of late-stage, distributed solar photovoltaic assets located in the northeast United States, the company said.
Chapter 3 focuses on the theoretical interpretation of semantic prosody. Semantic prosody, according to Louw, is the "consistent aura of meaning with which a form is imbued by its collocations" (80).
KARACHI -- Launching of the Book 'Common Misconceptions Prosody' will be held under the auspices of Library Committee of Arts Council of Pakistan Karachi on April 21.
Research on emotion perception has revealed that people can accurately recognize emotional expressions from visual stimuli (facial expressions; see Calvo & Nummenmaa, 2015), vocal stimuli (emotional prosody; see Scherer, 2003), body posture and movement (Coulson, 2004), and even tactile stimuli (Hertenstein, Holmes, McCullough, & Keltner, 2009).
Tuuli Tuisk, Livonian Word Prosody, Tartu 2015 (Dissertationes Philologiae Uralicae Universitatis Tartuensis 15).