pross

pross

(prɒz) or

prossie

n
a prostitute
References in classic literature ?
Possibly at home, but of a certainty impossible for handmaid to anticipate intentions of Miss Pross, as to admission or denial of the fact.
It proceeded from Miss Pross, the wild red woman, strong of hand, whose acquaintance he had first made at the Royal George Hotel at Dover, and had since improved.
Really, is bad enough," returned Miss Pross, "but better.
I don't want dozens of people who are not at all worthy of Ladybird, to come here looking after her," said Miss Pross.
All sorts of people who are not in the least degree worthy of the pet, are always turning up," said Miss Pross.
Lorry knew Miss Pross to be very jealous, but he also knew her by this time to be, beneath the service of her eccentricity, one of those unselfish creatures--found only among women--who will, for pure love and admiration, bind themselves willing slaves, to youth when they have lost it, to beauty that they never had, to accomplishments that they were never fortunate enough to gain, to bright hopes that never shone upon their own sombre lives.
Lorry had begun, when Miss Pross took him up short with:
Believe me, Miss Pross, I don't approach the topic with you, out of curiosity, but out of zealous interest.
To the best of my understanding, and bad's the best, you'll tell me," said Miss Pross, softened by the tone of the apology, "he is afraid of the whole subject.
Yet, a doubt lurks in my mind, Miss Pross, whether it is good for Doctor Manette to have that suppression always shut up within him.
Can't be helped," said Miss Pross, shaking her head.
said Miss Pross, rising to break up the conference; "and now we shall have hundreds of people pretty soon