protolanguage

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Related to protolanguages: Proto-linguistics

pro·to·lan·guage

 (prō′tō-lăng′gwĭj)
n.
A language that is the recorded or hypothetical ancestor of another language or group of languages. Also called Ursprache.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

protolanguage

(ˌprəʊtəʊˈlæŋɡwɪdʒ)
n
1. (Linguistics) an extinct and unrecorded language reconstructed by comparison of its recorded or living descendants. Also called: Ursprache
2. (Historical Terms) an extinct and unrecorded language reconstructed by comparison of its recorded or living descendants. Also called: Ursprache
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro•to•lan•guage

(ˈproʊ toʊˌlæŋ gwɪdʒ)

n.
the reconstructed or postulated parent form of a language or a group of related languages.
[1945–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
kantakieli
References in periodicals archive ?
The syntax in human language today was made possible by our ancestors' long use of symbolic protolanguages. Genes and culture coevolved to reorganize the human brain.
Furthermore, languages or protolanguages may link with specific singing styles because of the inherent traits of the shortest transitory speech elements.
Reconstructed words for species are indicative of their substantial significance to speakers of protolanguages. The approach, then, has the potential to contribute to the discussion of the antiquity of coconut in Panama by comparing words for the species in genetically related modern languages spoken there and in adjacent areas.
(116) Deacon, The Symbolic Species; Aiello, "The Foundations of Human Language"; Donald, "Preconditions for the Evolution of Protolanguages."