proton


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pro·ton

 (prō′tŏn′)
n. Abbr. p
The stable, positively charged nucleon, having a mass 1,836 times that of an electron and being a baryon composed of two up quarks and one down quark. The proton is a basic component of all atomic nuclei and the nucleus of the protium isotope of hydrogen.

[From Greek prōton, neuter of prōtos, first; see per in Indo-European roots.]

pro·ton′ic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

proton

(ˈprəʊtɒn)
n
(General Physics) a stable, positively charged elementary particle, found in atomic nuclei in numbers equal to the atomic number of the element. It is a baryon with a charge of 1.602176462 × 10–19 coulomb, a rest mass of 1.672 62159 × 10–27 kilogram, and spin
[C20: from Greek prōtos first]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro•ton

(ˈproʊ tɒn)

n.
a positively charged elementary particle found in all atomic nuclei, the lightest and most stable of the baryons, and having a positive charge of 1.602 x 1019 coulombs: the number of protons in an atom equals that element's atomic number.
[1915–20; n. use of Greek prôton, neuter of prôtos first]
pro•ton′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·ton

(prō′tŏn′)
A stable subatomic particle that has a positive electric charge and is part of the nucleus of an atom. Its charge is opposite to that of an electron but is equal in magnitude. A proton's mass is 1,836 times that of an electron. See more at atom.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

proton

1. One of the three basic particles in the atom, found in the nucleus with the neutron. It has positive charge.
2. A positively charged subatomic particle.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.proton - a stable particle with positive charge equal to the negative charge of an electronproton - a stable particle with positive charge equal to the negative charge of an electron
hydrogen ion - a positively charged atom of hydrogen; that is to say, a normal hydrogen atomic nucleus
nucleon - a constituent (proton or neutron) of an atomic nucleus
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
proton
proton
protoni
proton
proton
proton
róteind
protonas
protons
protón
proton
proton
proton

proton

[ˈprəʊtɒn] Nprotón m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

proton

[ˈprəʊtɒn] nproton m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

proton

nProton nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

proton

[ˈprəʊtɒn] nprotone m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

proton

(ˈprəuton) noun
a particle with a positive electrical charge, forming part of the nucleus of an atom.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

pro·ton

n. protón, partícula en el núcleo de un átomo cuya carga positiva y masa es 1836 veces la de un neutrón. La terapia especializada con uso de partículas de protón se usa en tratamientos de cáncer de la próstata, del cerebro y del cáncer de la mama.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Renub Research report Japan Proton Therapy Market, Patients by 10 Cancer Types (Central Nervous System (CNS), Head and Neck, Lung, GI (Gastro-Intestinal), Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC), Pancreas, Gynecologic, Prostate, Bone and Soft Tissue, Others) Reimbursement Policies & Persons Treated at Centers provides a comprehensive assessment of the fast-evolving, high-growth of Japan Proton Therapy Market.
In a video clip uploaded on his official Facebook site, the Prime Minister was seen admiring the body design of Proton's latest model while being given a briefing on it by the automotive company's Engineering director Hazrin Fazail Haroon.
Japan-based cancer radiotherapy company B dot Medical Inc disclosed on Thursday that it has started developing an ultra-compact proton cancer therapy system to replace the commonly used x-ray cancer therapy system (LINAC) in hospitals.
Nuclear physicists from the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) accomplished, for the first time, the feat of measuring the pressure distribution inside a proton - one of the three larger subatomic particles, along with the electron and the neutron, that makes up all atoms.
Proton Partners International is building a network of Rutherford Cancer Centres across the UK to be able to provide cancer patients with proton beam therapy treatment as well as radiotherapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, imaging and wellbeing services.
The proton beam therapy targets certain cancers very precisely, increasing success rates and reducing side-effects.
Next Monday Proton Partners, founded by Walton-born ex-soldier Mike Walsh, is set to start work on its [pounds sterling]35m proton beam therapy centre at thePaddington Village development site in Liverpool's Knowledge Quarter.
DPI Research adds"United States Proton Therapy Market: Demand, Insights, Analysis, Opportunities, Growth Potential and Forecast 2018 -- 2025"
Proton arc therapy has the possibility to further improve the quality of the treatment by enhancing the dose conformity at the tumor level while reducing the total dose received by the patient.
"This new research reinforces the value of proton therapy and underscores why it's so important that cancer patients receive fair, timely decisions from their insurers when their doctors recommend proton radiation as the best treatment," said Daniel E.
Therefore, for a lot of patients with pediatric cancer, proton therapy needs exceptional assurance.