protoplanetary

protoplanetary

(ˌprəʊtəʊˈplænɪtərɪ)
adj
(Astronomy) of or relating to protoplanets
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While acknowledging the analogy between Saturn's ring system and protoplanetary disks, Esposito maintains that the planet's rings may be as ancient as the 4.5-billion-year-old solar system and could remain visible for billions of years to come.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- The first unbiased survey of protoplanetary disks surrounding young stars in the Taurus star-forming region turned up a higher-than-expected number of disks with features suggesting nascent planets, according to a new study.
The discovery comes through a new technique which revolves around studying protoplanetary disks 6 regions filled with gas and dust 6 surrounding young, newly formed stars.
Rebecca Martin, a NASA Sagan Fellow from the University of Colorado in Boulder, and astronomer Mario Livio of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md, suggest that the size and location of an asteroid belt, shaped by the evolution of the Sun's protoplanetary disk and by the gravitational influence of a nearby giant Jupiter-like planet, may determine whether complex life will evolve on an Earth-like planet.
Uranus and Neptune should have ended up much less massive, because billions of miles from the infant Sun the protoplanetary pickings were slim and the assembly process too slow.
The Hubble Space Telescope has spied many such protoplanetary disks.
"The observed spirals in Elias 2-27 are the first direct evidence for the shocks of spiral density waves in a protoplanetary disk," says lead author Laura M.
Now it's on the ride of its life, and while it will survive the encounter, its protoplanetary disk won't be so lucky," Ruth Murray-Clay, lead author of the study from CfA, said.
"Planet migration" is expected when the original protoplanetary disk of gas and dust is still massive enough to exert a gravitational effect.
These building blocks come from a flattened mass of material, known as a protoplanetary disk, that surrounds young stars.
Now, in a major discovery, scientists have detected the "water snow line" - the region where the temperature drops sufficiently low for snow to form - in a protoplanetary disk around a young star.
The standard model explaining how the solar system formed from a protoplanetary disk, a swirling disk of gas and dust surrounding our Sun, billions of years ago suggests that our planet should be a water world.