proudly


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proud

 (proud)
adj. proud·er, proud·est
1. Feeling pleasurable satisfaction over an act, possession, quality, or relationship by which one measures one's stature or self-worth: proud of one's child; proud to serve one's country.
2. Occasioning or being a reason for pride: a proud moment when she received her diploma.
3. Feeling or showing justifiable self-respect: too proud to beg.
4. Filled with or showing excessive self-esteem: a proud and haughty aristocrat.
5. Of great dignity; honored: a proud name.
6. Majestic; magnificent: proud alpine peaks.
7. Spirited. Used of an animal: proud steeds.

[Middle English, from Old English prūd, from Old French prou, prud, brave, virtuous, oblique case of prouz, from Vulgar Latin *prōdis, from Late Latin prōde, advantageous, from Latin prōdesse, to be good : prōd-, for (variant of prō-, with d on the model of red-, prevocalic variant of re-, back, again; see pro-1) + esse, to be; see es- in Indo-European roots.]

proud′ly adv.
proud′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.proudly - with pride; in a proud manner; "he walked proudly into town"
Translations
بافْتِخار، بِكِبْرِياء
hrdě
stolt
meî stolti
hrdo
ponosno
gururlaiftiharla

proudly

[ˈpraʊdlɪ] ADV (= with satisfaction) → con orgullo; (= arrogantly) → arrogantemente, con arrogancia; (= splendidly, impressively) → de forma imponente
he proudly showed me his drawingorgulloso, me enseñó su dibujo, me enseñó con orgullo su dibujo

proudly

[ˈpraʊdli] advfièrement

proudly

advstolz

proudly

[ˈpraʊdlɪ] adv (see adj) → orgogliosamente, con fierezza, superbamente

proud

(praud) adjective
1. feeling pleasure or satisfaction at one's achievements, possessions, connections etc. He was proud of his new house; She was proud of her son's achievements; He was proud to play football for the school.
2. having a (too) high opinion of oneself; arrogant. She was too proud to talk to us.
3. wishing to be independent. She was too proud to accept help.
4. splendid or impressive. The assembled fleet was a proud sight.
ˈproudly adverb
do (someone) proud
to give (a person) good treatment or entertainment. We always do them proud when they come to dinner.
References in classic literature ?
He bade his comrades good-bye and marched proudly away to do battle with the enemy.
Lions have a superstitious terror of my voice," answered the Cock, proudly.
He proudly beats the air, conscious of his dignity, and meditates intended mischief.
Dorothy looked to see what they were cheering at, and discovered that behind the band was the famous Scarecrow, riding proudly upon the back of a wooden Saw-Horse which pranced along the street almost as gracefully as if it had been made of flesh.
It is, my dear sir," answered the Wogglebug, proudly.
Well now, I guess she ain't been much spoiled," he muttered, proudly.
I smiled proudly at her--too proudly, for she dropped her eyes and was for the moment silent.
And proudly she cried, "These fire-flies shall be My jewels, since the stars can never come to me.
Then the lion told his wife, quite proudly, just what he had said to the Doctor.
I am the mother of the Sun, and I command you to ride away from here at once, and I pronounce sentence of death upon you, for you proudly let yourself be called the Sun-Hero without having done anything to deserve the name.
Now, had the same young lady been engaged with a volume of the Spectator, instead of such a work, how proudly would she have produced the book, and told its name; though the chances must be against her being occupied by any part of that voluminous publication, of which either the matter or manner would not disgust a young person of taste: the substance of its papers so often consisting in the statement of improbable circumstances, unnatural characters, and topics of conversation which no longer concern anyone living; and their language, too, frequently so coarse as to give no very favourable idea of the age that could endure it.
At first the family felt some constraint in intercourse with Prince Andrew; he seemed a man from another world, and for a long time Natasha trained the family to get used to him, proudly assuring them all that he only appeared to be different, but was really just like all of them, and that she was not afraid of him and no one else ought to be.