proudly


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proud

 (proud)
adj. proud·er, proud·est
1. Feeling pleasurable satisfaction over an act, possession, quality, or relationship by which one measures one's stature or self-worth: proud of one's child; proud to serve one's country.
2. Occasioning or being a reason for pride: a proud moment when she received her diploma.
3. Feeling or showing justifiable self-respect: too proud to beg.
4. Filled with or showing excessive self-esteem: a proud and haughty aristocrat.
5. Of great dignity; honored: a proud name.
6. Majestic; magnificent: proud alpine peaks.
7. Spirited. Used of an animal: proud steeds.

[Middle English, from Old English prūd, from Old French prou, prud, brave, virtuous, oblique case of prouz, from Vulgar Latin *prōdis, from Late Latin prōde, advantageous, from Latin prōdesse, to be good : prōd-, for (variant of prō-, with d on the model of red-, prevocalic variant of re-, back, again; see pro-1) + esse, to be; see es- in Indo-European roots.]

proud′ly adv.
proud′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.proudly - with pride; in a proud manner; "he walked proudly into town"
Translations
بافْتِخار، بِكِبْرِياء
hrdě
stolt
meî stolti
hrdo
ponosno
gururlaiftiharla

proudly

[ˈpraʊdlɪ] ADV (= with satisfaction) → con orgullo; (= arrogantly) → arrogantemente, con arrogancia; (= splendidly, impressively) → de forma imponente
he proudly showed me his drawingorgulloso, me enseñó su dibujo, me enseñó con orgullo su dibujo

proudly

[ˈpraʊdli] advfièrement

proudly

advstolz

proudly

[ˈpraʊdlɪ] adv (see adj) → orgogliosamente, con fierezza, superbamente

proud

(praud) adjective
1. feeling pleasure or satisfaction at one's achievements, possessions, connections etc. He was proud of his new house; She was proud of her son's achievements; He was proud to play football for the school.
2. having a (too) high opinion of oneself; arrogant. She was too proud to talk to us.
3. wishing to be independent. She was too proud to accept help.
4. splendid or impressive. The assembled fleet was a proud sight.
ˈproudly adverb
do (someone) proud
to give (a person) good treatment or entertainment. We always do them proud when they come to dinner.
References in classic literature ?
He bade his comrades good-bye and marched proudly away to do battle with the enemy.
"Lions have a superstitious terror of my voice," answered the Cock, proudly.
He proudly beats the air, conscious of his dignity, and meditates intended mischief.
Dorothy looked to see what they were cheering at, and discovered that behind the band was the famous Scarecrow, riding proudly upon the back of a wooden Saw-Horse which pranced along the street almost as gracefully as if it had been made of flesh.
It said this, and went away clumsily and proudly. A child told it to me.
"It's almost like a circus," said Aunt Em, proudly. "I can't help feelin' high an' mighty in this kind of a turn-out."
Harmon informed Anne proudly. "Of course an Avonlea dressmaker wouldn't do for Jane under the circumstances."
"Well now, I guess she ain't been much spoiled," he muttered, proudly. "I guess my putting in my oar occasional never did much harm after all.
I smiled proudly at her--too proudly, for she dropped her eyes and was for the moment silent.
I would be fair and stately, with a bright star to shine And give a queenly air to this crimson robe of mine." And proudly she cried, "These fire-flies shall be My jewels, since the stars can never come to me." Just then a tiny dew-drop that hung o'er the dell On the breast of the bud like a soft star fell; But impatiently she flung it away from her leaf, And it fell on her mother like a tear of grief, While she folded to her breast, with wilful pride, A glittering fire-fly that hung by her side.
Pinocchio ran to look at himself in a bowl of water, and he felt so happy that he said proudly:
Then the lion told his wife, quite proudly, just what he had said to the Doctor.