proven


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prov·en

 (pro͞o′vən)
v.
A past tense and a past participle of prove.
adj.
Having been demonstrated or verified without doubt: "a Soviet leader of proven shrewdness and prescience" (Joyce Carol Oates). See Usage Note at prove.

prov′en·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

proven

(ˈpruːvən)
vb
1. a past participle of prove
2. (Law) See not proven
adj
tried; tested: a proven method.
ˈprovenly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.proven - established beyond doubt; "a proven liar"; "a Soviet leader of proven shrewdness"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

proven

adjective established, accepted, proved, confirmed, tried, tested, checked, reliable, valid, definite, authentic, certified, verified, attested, undoubted, dependable, trustworthy There is a proven link between smoking and lung cancer.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مُبَرْهَن، مُثْبَت
dokázaný
bevist
bebizonyítottbizonyított
sannaîur
dokázaný
kanıtlanmış

proven

[ˈpruːvən]
A. PP of prove
B. ADJ
1. (gen) [formula, method] → de eficacia probada; [abilities] → probado
it's a proven fact thatestá probado or demostrado que ..., es un hecho comprobado que ...
2. [ˈprəʊvən] (Scot) (Jur) the case was found not provenel acusado fue absuelto por falta de pruebas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

proven

[ˈprəʊvən ˈpruːvən]
pp of prove
adj [ability] → avéré(e)
to have a proven track record → avoir fait ses preuves
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

proven

ptp of prove
adjbewährt; not proven (Scot Jur) → unbewiesen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

prove

(pruːv) verb
1. to show to be true or correct. This fact proves his guilt; He was proved guilty; Can you prove your theory?
2. to turn out, or be found, to be. His suspicions proved (to be) correct; This tool proved very useful.
ˈproven adjective
(especially in law) proved.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
When he was put on his Trial, the Verdict was Not Proven. Not Proven won't do for us.
The soul, I said, being, as is now proven, immortal, must be the fairest of compositions and cannot be compounded of many elements?
2) All wise are Zeus and Apollo, and nothing is hid from their ken; They are gods; and in wits a man may surpass his fellow men; But that a mortal seer knows more than I know--where Hath this been proven? Or how without sign assured, can I blame Him who saved our State when the winged songstress came, Tested and tried in the light of us all, like gold assayed?
With an exasperated look on her face, Tzy-ying then said, "Does this need to be proven?"
Proven automates much of the work for employers seeking to fill open positions.
Proven IT was founded in 2003 by John Cosich with sons Brett, Tory and Johnny and Vice President Jeff Johnson.
As a result our technologies are much more proven and we are closer to market."
While I agree with Denise's sentiments I'm afraid she is being a little naive if she still believes that in this country you are innocent until proven guilty.
VICTIMS of serious miscarriages of justice such as the Birmingham Six could be denied compensation because government proposals would require them to prove they did not commit the crime, flying in the face of the "innocent until proven guilty" principle, Labour has claimed.
Voltage Indicators should be proven at the normal working voltage.
At the end of 1989, the Middle East held 661.0bn barrels of oil, or 65.7% of the world's proven oil reserves, and at the end of 1999, the region had 685.8bn barrels, or 63.2%.
Joanne Dowd, 29, unemployed from Stockton, said: "It's meant to be innocent until proven guilty, but in the media it often seems to be guilty until proven innocent."