proverbial

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pro·ver·bi·al

 (prə-vûr′bē-əl)
adj.
1. Of the nature of a proverb.
2. Expressed in a proverb.
3. Widely referred to, as if the subject of a proverb; famous.

pro·ver′bi·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

proverbial

(prəˈvɜːbɪəl)
adj
1. (prenominal) commonly or traditionally referred to, esp as being an example of some peculiarity, characteristic, etc
2. of, connected with, embodied in, or resembling a proverb
proˈverbially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro•ver•bi•al

(prəˈvɜr bi əl)

adj.
1. of, characteristic of, or resembling a proverb.
2. expressed in or as if in a proverb.
3. having become an object of common mention or reference: his proverbial wit.
pro•ver′bi•al•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.proverbial - of or relating to or resembling or expressed in a proverb; "he kicked the proverbial bucket"; "the proverbial grasshopper"
2.proverbial - widely known and spoken of; "her proverbial lateness"; "the proverbial absentminded professor"; "your proverbial dizzy blonde"
known - apprehended with certainty; "a known quantity"; "the limits of the known world"; "a musician known throughout the world"; "a known criminal"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

proverbial

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مَثَلي، مَضْرِب الأمْثال
příslovečný
közismertközmodásos
málsháttar-; alòekktur
povestnýpríslovečný
atasözüne ait

proverbial

[prəˈvɜːbɪəl] ADJproverbial
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

proverbial

[prəˈvɜːrbiəl] adjproverbial(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

proverbial

adj (lit, fig)sprichwörtlich
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

proverbial

[prəˈvɜːbɪəl] adjproverbiale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

proverb

(ˈprovəːb) noun
a well-known saying that gives good advice or expresses a supposed truth. Two common proverbs are `Many hands make light work' and `Don't count your chickens before they're hatched!'
proˈverbial adjective
proˈverbially adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Texts on Textiles: Proverbiality as Characteristic of Equivocal Communication at the East African Coast (Swahili), Journal of African Cultural Studies, 17(2): 131-160.
"'A Fund of Wise Sayings': Proverbiality in Tolkien." Roots and Branches: Selected Papers on Tolkien, Walking Tree, 2007, pp.
Thus the proverbiality of language, the means to maintaining the individual's calibration, is directly connected to deception.