providently


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prov·i·dent

 (prŏv′ĭ-dənt, -dĕnt′)
adj.
1. Providing for future needs or events: "a shelter with bunks, springs only, intended for provident hikers who carried sleeping bags" (Donald Hall).
2. Frugal; economical: provident in spending money.

[Middle English, from Latin prōvidēns, prōvident-, present participle of prōvidēre, to provide for; see provide.]

prov′i·dent·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.providently - in a provident manner; "providently, he had saved up some money for emergencies"
improvidently - in an improvident manner; "he lived improvidently for the moment"
Translations

providently

[ˈprɒvɪdəntlɪ] ADVpróvidamente

providently

References in periodicals archive ?
2011) ("The court providently exercised its discretion in considering defendants' surreply.
The multitude of people at this present were innumerable: but to conclude God be thanked, for it, was such the great care of the worshipfull Citizens of London, & all things so providently foreseen, by them, that little or no hurt or danger ensued to any: which was greatly feared of many, to have happened: by reason of the great multitudes that were in the Citie, being come both farre & neere thither.
Providently for us, in Gregg Davidson we had exactly the right person to perform this difficult task.
Providently, not all of these poisonous missives reached their targets in the cold light of next day's sobriety.
39) They also point very providently that the main purpose of a war is still 4GW oriented and focused on changing minds of "our opponents to force them to fulfill our will.
The motion court providently exercised its discretion in granting defendants' cross motion for an extension of time to interpose an answer.
There are Milagros and her still-red rose, Jesus and his salmon-colored stone, and Nena Cadavid, the other NN of Moca-Moca, who providently diversified in search of favors.
4) This motivated Galton to endorse methods for accelerating the process of human evolution, writing, "What nature does blindly, slowly, and ruthlessly, man may do providently, quickly and kindly".
For the principal and proper work of history being to instruct and enable men, by the knowledge of actions past, to bear themselves prudently in the present and providently towards the future" (Hobbes 1839-1845, viii).
In the process of reroofing All Saints' the previous summer, the group had providently applied to the local power authority, which issued them a contract.
She has noticed that although the demand of domestic and care work was on the increase, that the model of housewife was falling in the EU region recently and that this need for this job was met providently by the female "undocumented migrant", policy on immigration was too restrictive for non-EU citizens.