provincialist


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pro·vin·cial·ist

 (prə-vĭn′shə-lĭst)
n.
One who is a native or inhabitant of a province.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

provincialist

(prəˈvɪnʃəlɪst)
n
1. (Human Geography) a person who lives in a province
2. (Human Geography) a person who advocates provincialism
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Other than those isolated instances, the proletariat is divided by the powerful interest groups across cross-cutting contentions of resource sharing, provincialist tendencies and religious dichotomies.
All these discussions culminate in a paralyzed literary scene: "the Turkish novelist is either a snob, a dandy, or an unrefined provincialist stuck in the narrow traditional world" (603).
Like Martel, di Benedetto was a provincialist, avoiding Buenos Aires for his hometown of Mendoza; he was also a cinephile who wrote film criticism and screenplays, and movies influenced his clipped scene-setting.
Some of the most influential constitutional scholars of the 20th century chastised the Privy Council for taking an ahistorical approach to constitutional interpretation and failing to achieve the clear intent of the framers, (226) a view that was particularly popular among (more centralist) English Canadian scholars dissatisfied with the provincialist leanings of the Privy Council.
Put simply, provincialist discontent profoundly affected forest policy but the relationship was not entirely mutual; conservation framed the specific context within which Vogel was able to abolish the provinces but it was neither the cause of nor a significant justification for abolition.
Before the First World War and after, the discussion was pretty much dominated by the argument between Josiah Royce, the "provincialist" philosopher; the anthropologist Franz Boas, who, believing that societies are more alike than not, wanted the "enlargement of political units" and welcomed immigration; and Randolph Bourne, the journalist, whose essay "Trans-National America" in 1915 anticipated Horace Kallen's work in the 1920s on cultural pluralism that adumbrated multiculturalism at century's end.
These beliefs feed from animism, commonly seen as a lower, primitive form of belief when compared to Buddhism, the official state religion, and thus often regarded as nonofficial, nonmodern and provincialist, practiced especially in remote rural regions, especially the Northeast.
Being white settlers, their whole art discourse and marketing connected with those metropolitan centers, subject to what I called in an essay in Artforum in 1974 "the provincialist bind," which was a description of a world system of art.
(22) Others, like Senator Bert Brown, prefer to think that an elected Senate would resolutely be a provincialist body, where senators would stick to the views of the provincial voters who elected them.
Then, but also later, the discourse of legitimization exalts apparently forgotten topics: the one of "roots", "fields", "ancestor origins" or "ancestor land", accompanied by archaist, provincialist, anti-Occidental temptations.