provincialism

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pro·vin·cial·ism

 (prə-vĭn′shə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. A regional word, phrase, pronunciation, or usage.
2. The condition of being provincial; lack of sophistication or perspective. Also called provinciality.
3. The act or an instance of placing the interests of one's province before one's nation.

provincialism

(prəˈvɪnʃəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. narrowness of mind or outlook; lack of sophistication
2. a word or attitude characteristic of a provincial
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) attention to the affairs of one's province rather than the whole nation
4. the state or quality of being provincial
Also: localism

pro•vin•cial•ism

(prəˈvɪn ʃəˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. narrowness of views or interests; lack of sophistication.
2. a trait, habit of thought, etc., characteristic of a provincial, a province, or the provinces.
3. a word, expression, or pronunciation peculiar to a region.
4. devotion to one's own province before the nation as a whole.
[1760–70]

provincialism

localism.
See also: Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.provincialism - a lack of sophistication
narrow-mindedness, narrowness - an inclination to criticize opposing opinions or shocking behavior
2.provincialism - a partiality for some particular place
partisanship, partiality - an inclination to favor one group or view or opinion over alternatives
Translations

provincialism

[prəˈvɪnʃəlɪzəm] Nprovincialismo m

provincialism

provincialism

[prəˈvɪnʃəˌlɪzm] n (pej) → provincialismo
References in periodicals archive ?
86) Carroll hoped that the Irish government would not sponsor the Abbey's reconstruction since '[i]t will almost inevitably come under subtle government control and be subject to the numerous national taboos of the ignorant and the smug pietistic provincialists.
Forsey, for example, pushed for both the CCF and the labour movement to advocate use of the power of disallowance, drafted detailed labour memoranda calling for centralization of labour law and social policy, and passionately defended national unity and the British constitutional tradition from the separatists and provincialists who began to make waves towards the end of his career at the CLC.
And Jespersen (1949: 360) cites Thomas Wright Hill [1763-1851] as saying that "r ought more carefully to be preserved for posterity, than can be hoped, if the provincialists of the Metropolis and their tasteless imitators [are] to be tolerated".