provocatory

provocatory

(prəˈvɒkətərɪ)
adj
tending to provoke
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
One of them is heard saying "the actions of the Ukrainian armed vessels in the Kerch Strait had a provocatory character" parroting the version of events put forward by Russian authorities.
CAIRO - 12 June 2017: The recently-designated as terrorist, Sheikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi, might soon make a come back appearance on the Qatar-sponsored Al Jazeera Network in a move deemed "provocatory" by observers.
Shouting slogans and raising posters and placards, activists vented their ire at the common chauvinistic prejudice that aims to allegedly justify sexual aggregation by blaming the action on 'provocatory dresses worn by the victim.
There would be a process of transforming all provocatory or abusive actions into targets of reaction, not limiting them to a conditioned response that has been played out time and time again with very little progression in the situation of lifting some of the oppression off of the Palestinians.
Instead of arguing his case, von Luttwitz-Randau's involuntary response has a largely provocatory effect, resulting in a tirade by the chief maquisard:
The filmmaker thus uses the dominant psychological state of "a sick protagonist," he explains, "someone who is not normal, so as to make a continuous mimesis, which would allow the author an anomalous and provocatory stylistic freedom" (Empiricism, 183).