provost


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Related to provost: provost marshal

pro·vost

 (prō′vōst′, -vəst, prŏv′əst)
n.
1. A university administrator of high rank.
2. The highest official in certain cathedrals or collegiate churches.
3. The keeper of a prison.
4. The chief magistrate of certain Scottish cities.

[Middle English, from Old English profost and Old French provost, both from Medieval Latin prōpositus, alteration of Latin praepositus, person placed over others, superintendent, from past participle of praepōnere, to place over : prae-, pre- + pōnere, to put; see apo- in Indo-European roots.]

provost

(ˈprɒvəst)
n
1. an appointed person who superintends or presides
2. (Education) the head of certain university colleges or schools
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Scotland) the chairman and civic head of certain district councils or (formerly) of a burgh council. Compare convener2
4. (Anglicanism) Church of England the senior dignitary of one of the more recent cathedral foundations
5. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church
a. the head of a cathedral chapter in England and some other countries
b. (formerly) the member of a monastic community second in authority under the abbot
6. (Historical Terms) (in medieval times) an overseer, steward, or bailiff in a manor
7. (Law) obsolete a prison warder
8. (Military) military Brit and Canadian a military policeman
[Old English profost head of a chapter, reinforced in Middle English by Anglo-Norman French provost, from Medieval Latin prōpositus, synonym of Latin praepositus chief, head]

pro•vost

(ˈproʊ voʊst, ˈprɒv əst or, esp. in military usage, ˈproʊ voʊ)

n.
1. a person appointed to superintend or preside.
2. a high-ranking administrative officer of some colleges and universities, concerned with the curriculum, faculty appointments, etc.
3. the chief dignitary of a cathedral or collegiate church.
4. the mayor of a municipality in Scotland.
5. Obs. a prison warden.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English profost < Medieval Latin prōpositus abbot, prior, provost, literally, (one) placed before, Latin: past participle of prōpōnere. See propound]
pro′vost•ship`, n.

provost

- Etymologically, an official "placed before" or "put in charge" of others, from Latin praepositus, "superintendent."
See also related terms for official.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.provost - a high-ranking university administrator
academic administrator - an administrator in a college or university
Translations
司祭学寮長学長市長教務部長

provost

[ˈprɒvəst]
A. N (Univ) → rector(a) m/f (Scot) → alcalde/esa m/f
B. CPD provost marshal Ncapitán m preboste

provost

[ˈprɒvəst] n
(British) [university] → principal m
(Scottish)maire m

provost

n
(Scot) → Bürgermeister(in) m(f)
(Univ) → ˜ Dekan(in) m(f)
(Eccl) → Propst m

provost

[ˈprɒvəst] n (Brit) (Univ) → rettore m; (Scot) → sindaco
References in classic literature ?
The rabble by shouting and noise having increased their numbers to several thousands, they began with Sir Patrick Johnston, who was one of the treaters, and the year before had been Lord Provost.
When my Lord Commissioner being informed, there were a thousand of the seamen and rabble come up from Leith; and apprehending if it were suffered to go on, it might come to a dangerous head, and be out of his power to suppress, he sent for the Lord Provost, and demanded that the guards should march into the city.
The Lord Provost, after some difficulty, yielded; though it was alleged, that it was what never was known in Edinburgh before.
Nothing was to be heard but imprecations on the Flemish, the provost of the merchants, the Cardinal de Bourbon, the bailiff of the courts, Madame Marguerite of Austria, the sergeants with their rods, the cold, the heat, the bad weather, the Bishop of Paris, the Pope of the Fools, the pillars, the statues, that closed door, that open window; all to the vast amusement of a band of scholars and lackeys scattered through the mass, who mingled with all this discontent their teasing remarks, and their malicious suggestions, and pricked the general bad temper with a pin, so to speak.
An honorable man is Gilles Lecornu, brother of Master Jehan Lecornu, provost of the king's house, son of Master Mahiet Lecornu, first porter of the Bois de Vincennes,--all bourgeois of Paris, all married, from father to son.
If thou refusest my fair proffer,'' said the Prince, ``the Provost of the lists shall cut thy bowstring, break thy bow and arrows, and expel thee from the presence as a faint-hearted craven.
The sports were regulated by an officer of inferior rank, termed the Provost of the Games; for the high rank of the marshals of the lists would have been held degraded, had they condescended to superintend the sports of the yeomanry.
Now, Locksley,'' said Prince John to the bold yeoman, with a bitter smile, ``wilt thou try conclusions with Hubert, or wilt thou yield up bow, baldric, and quiver, to the Provost of the sports?
THE Provost of Coventry Cathedral John Petty (left) will make history tomorrow as he becomes the city's first Dean - but he will be leaving the job within days.
Our customers at RadioShack have shown a high interest in more and more technical-related products," Provost said.
We have to learn how bus tour operators run their businesses," Provost told a handful of people sitting around the boardroom table of the Aboriginal Tourism Authority in Calgary on March 19.
Provost brings deep expertise in program design and implementation strategies for post-approval services to INC Research's Late Phase Services, including late stage trials, risk management, patient adherence and post-approval safety.