provost court


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provost court

n.
A military tribunal convened in occupied territory, especially one with jurisdiction over lesser criminal offenses committed by civilians.

[provost, military police officer + court.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

provost court

(prəˈvəʊ)
n
1. (Military) a military court for trying people charged with minor offences in an occupied area
2. (Law) a military court for trying people charged with minor offences in an occupied area
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pro′vost court`

(ˈproʊ voʊ)
n.
(in occupied territory) a military court, usu. composed of one officer, empowered to try military personnel and civilians for minor offenses.
[1860–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.provost court - a military court for trying people charged with minor offenses in an occupied area
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
military court - a judicial court of commissioned officers for the discipline and punishment of military personnel
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He then joined the 5th Missouri Volunteer Infantry and deployed to the Philippines, where his legal skills resulted in his being first assigned as a Judge of the Inferior Provost Court and later as a Judge of the Superior Provost Court of Manila.
He subsequently served as a judge on the first Provost Court organized in the Philippines under military occupation.
Fred Spurlock, a black American, was brought before a provost court and charged with assaulting a civilian policeman.
He was tried and sentenced to imprisonment by a provost court for assaulting two Marine sentries on duty at the Navy Yard.
(30) Subsequently, White was brought before a military tribunal called the "provost court." (31) At this "hearing," White objected to the tribunal's jurisdiction, demanded a trial by jury, and requested a continuance so that his attorney could have additional time to prepare White's defense.
The provisions of this chapter conferring jurisdiction upon courts martial do not deprive military commissions, provost courts, or other military tribunals of concurrent jurisdiction with respect to offenders or offenses that by statute or by the law of war may be tried by military commissions, provost courts, or other military tribunals.
In this position, Chiperfield was in charge of all civil affairs for that part of Germany occupied by the Corps: which meant that not only did he operate a "Provost Court" to prosecute German civilian offenders, but he also supervised "all the cities, Burgermeistereis, and political units located within the Corps area." (18)
citizen, was arrested by the military and brought before the provost court on a charge of embezzlement.
(1) The other is Department of the Army Pamphlet 27-9-2, Military Judges' Benchbook for Provost Courts (Provost Court Benchbook).
[section] 821 (2006) (stating that "the provisions of this chapter conferring jurisdiction upon courts-martial do not deprive military commissions, provost courts, or other military tribunals of concurrent jurisdiction with respect to offenders and offenses that by statute or by the law of war may be tried by military commissions, provost courts, or other military tribunals.") (emphasis added)).
[sections] 821 ("The provisions of [the UCMJ] conferring jurisdiction upon courts-martial do not deprive military commissions, provost courts, or other military tribunals of concurrent jurisdiction with respect to offenders or offenses that by statute or by the law of war may be tried by military commissions, provost courts, or other military tribunals.")
Article 36(b) also requires that rules and regulations made under Article 36(a) "shall be uniform insofar as practicable." (8) One might argue that this uniformity clause implies that the rules and regulations must, "insofar as practicable," be uniform as between courts-martial, military commissions, and other military tribunals (such as provost courts),9 but the better reading is that the uniformity referred to is uniformity among the various armed forces.