Psalter

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Psal·ter

also psal·ter  (sôl′tər)
n.
A book containing the book of Psalms or a particular version of, musical setting for, or selection from it.

[Middle English, from Old English psaltere and Old French psaultier, both from Late Latin psaltērium, from Latin, psaltery, from Greek psaltērion; see psaltery.]

Psalter

(ˈsɔːltə)
n
1. (Bible) another name for Psalms, esp in the version in the Book of Common Prayer
2. (Bible) a translation, musical, or metrical version of the Psalms
3. (Bible) a devotional or liturgical book containing a version of Psalms, often with a musical setting
[Old English psaltere, from Late Latin psaltērium, from Greek psaltērion stringed instrument, from psallein to play a stringed instrument]

Psal•ter

(ˈsɔl tər)

n.
1. the Biblical book of Psalms.
2. (sometimes l.c.) psalmbook.
[before 900; Middle English sauter (< Anglo-French), Old English saltere < Late Latin psaltērium the Psalter, Latin: a psaltery < Greek psaltḗrion, derivative (with -tērion n. suffix) of psállein to pluck]

Psalter

 of bishops: bishops collectively.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Psalter - a collection of Psalms for liturgical usePsalter - a collection of Psalms for liturgical use
prayer book, prayerbook - a book containing prayers
Book of Common Prayer - the Anglican service book of the Church of England; has had several revisions since the Reformation and is widely admired for the dignity and beauty of its language
Translations

psalter

[ˈsɔːltəʳ] Nsalterio m

psalter

nPsalter m

psalter

[ˈsɔːltəʳ] nsalterio
References in classic literature ?
She tried several ballads, but found them inadequate; till, recollecting the psalter that her eyes had so often wandered over of a Sunday morning before she had eaten of the tree of knowledge, she chanted: "O ye Sun and Moon .
1539, under the direction of Archbishop Cranmer, Coverdale issued a revised edition, officially authorized for use in churches; its version of the Psalms still stands as the Psalter of the English Church.
The Book of Common Prayer, now used in the English Church coordinately with Bible and Psalter, took shape out of previous primers of private devotion, litanies, and hymns, mainly as the work of Archbishop Cranmer during the reign of Edward VI.
There was brother Bartholomew with a crucifix of rare carved ivory, and brother Luke With a white-backed psalter adorned with golden bees, and brother Francis with the "Slaying of the Innocents" most daintily set forth upon vellum.
He takes the Psalter as a case study because its central importance in monastic life means that there are a large number of surviving glossed Psalters, glossaries, and commentaries from Ireland, Anglo-Saxon England, and the Frankish territories.
The Ormesby Psalter is perhaps the most elusive of the gothic psalters produced in East Anglia in the early 14th century.
In Chapter 2, she speculates on the uses and production of psalter manuscripts, using three psalters as case studies: the Salisbury Psalter, the Paris Psalter, and the Achadeus Psalter.
Panayatova adds that Psalters were given as wedding gifts (248-9), so the presence of one at the end of the N-Town 'Marriage' is particularly apt.
As stated in the Introduction, Richard Rolle's rendition (henceforth RRP) is to be discussed in relation to three other English Psalter translations: the Middle English Glossed Prose Psalter (hereafter MEGPP) and the Psalters of the Early and the Late Wycliffite Bibles (EV and LV respectively).
It is in a way fitting, then, for thirteen medieval psalters now in two Dublin collections--one well known and the other less so--to receive a comprehensive catalogue and overview in this short, educative, and handsomely produced volume.
The introduction describes the manuscripts and discusses the language of the manuscripts, characteristics of the psalter, characteristics shared by the manuscripts, the canticles, the influence of a French text, the glossator, this psalter's place among English glossed psalters, and editorial procedure.
In the Middle Ages, psalters were beautifully made and often richly illuminated.