pseudobulb


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pseu·do·bulb

 (so͞o′dō-bŭlb′)
n.
A thickened, bulbous portion of the stem in many orchids.

pseudobulb

(ˈsjuːdəʊˌbʌlb)
n
(Botany) (in many tropical and epiphytic orchids) a bulb-like swelling of a stem
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pseudobulb - a solid bulblike enlargement of the stem of some orchids
enlargement - the state of being enlarged
References in periodicals archive ?
5 to 15 mm wide, green, clothed by 4 triangular to narrowly triangular sheaths, acute to acuminate, scarious-papyraceous, lacking a foliar blade, deciduous; leaf solitary, at the apex of the mature pseudobulb, conduplicate, oblong to oblong-elliptic, acute, fleshy, 6 to 29 cm long, ca.
Leaves numerous, coriaceous, forming a dense rosette, leaf sheaths not forming a pseudobulb, the old dry leaves remaining along the stem and covering it; sheaths ca.
A new vegetative shoot grows from the pseudobulb formed in the previous season.
Mealybugs were also concealed and were primarily found at the base of each plant hidden within the roots and beneath pseudobulb sheaths.
Pseudobulb 1-leaved, light green, ellipsoid to oblong-ovoid, strongly compressed, smooth but turning rough with age, 1.
As other orchids (Zotz 1995), each terminal shoot develops one pseudobulb yearly.
Usually, orchids without storage stems like Phalaenopsis, Vandas, Arachnis, require watering every other day, while orchids with pseudobulb like Cattleya, Dendrobiums, Oncidiums and Cymbidiums, including the dwarf Ascoscenda miniatum needs watering every three days.
Orchidaceae) with special reference to pseudobulb water-storage cells.
The plants have an interesting growth habit where the new pseudobulbs are produced about one-third of the way along the previous year's growth.
Traits such as time of flowering, shape, size and lip colour, scent of flowers and shape of the pseudobulbs from individuals stemming from "F1" crosses for the "Pedentive" clone showed strong traces of hybridization (Furusu, 2000).
For example Myrmecophila christinae (Orchidaceae) absorb nutrients derived from decomposing ant debris within its pseudobulbs (Rico-Gray et al.