pseudomembrane

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pseudomembrane

(ˌsjuːdəʊˈmɛmbreɪn)
n
(Medicine) a tough outer layer found on the surface of the mucous membrane or skin
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
difficile-associated disease (CDAD) is usually localized to the large bowel, where it manifests as diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, disease may progress to toxic megacolon, sepsis with or without intestinal perforation, and death (2) CDAD is increasingly recognized among residents of long-term care facilities (3) and even among persons living in the community (4); however, it most commonly affects patients in short-stay hospitals, where epidemic strains of C.
food poisoning, pseudomembranous colitis, tetanus, botulism, myonecrosis) (1).
ViroPharma commercializes Vancocin(R), approved for oral administration for treatment of antibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis caused by Clostridium difficile and enterocolitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin- resistant strains (for prescribing information, please download the package insert at http://www.
Numerous pseudomembranous ulcers, covered with pus, were seen on the vaginal mucosa.
These species cause botulism, tetanus, gas gangrene, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis, foodborne diarrhea, and necrotic enteritis in humans and infections in other animals.
Up to 20% of all hospital inpatients, 95-100% of those with pseudomembranous colitis, and 25-80% of all healthy neonates and infants test positive for this organism.
If untreated, pseudomembranous colitis (severe inflammation of the colon) and toxic megacolon may ensue leading to colectomy (removal of part of the colon) in some cases.
Endoscopic examinations were used to diagnose pseudomembranous colitis in patients with bloody chronic diarrhea or watery chronic diarrhea.
difficile, the spore-forming pathogen which causes severe diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis.
The discovery that antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis were due to Clostridium difficile further fueled vancomycin use (23).
After the diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis has been established, therapeutic measures should be initiated.
With access to this new diagnostic product, clinicians will be able to offer this enhanced detection system as an adjunct to their clinical diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis affecting many hospitalized patients.