pseudonymity


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Related to pseudonymity: Macedonian Kingdom

pseu·do·nym

 (so͞od′n-ĭm′)
n.
A fictitious name, especially a pen name.

[French pseudonyme, from Greek pseudōnumon, neuter of pseudōnumos, falsely named : pseudēs, false; see pseudo- + onuma, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

pseu′do·nym′i·ty n.
pseu·don′y·mous (so͞o-dŏn′ə-məs) adj.
pseu·don′y·mous·ly adv.

pseudonymity

1. use of a pseudonym by an author to conceal his identity.
2. the state or quality of being pseudonymous.
See also: Authors
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References in periodicals archive ?
Draper draws from conversations with CEOs, communication staff, regulators, policy officers, product developers, and industry representatives in her goal to explore the consequences of shifting industrial approaches to privacy, from opportunities for anonymity and pseudonymity offered by the field's early participants to strategies that operate in a contemporary environment that seemingly demands visibility.
One of the unique qualities of cryptocurrency is the pseudonymity of the parties involved in transactions.
(76) Due to the pseudonymity and permanency of transactions on the blockchain, recovery of stolen coins is almost impossible.
They contend blockchains suffer from "one important drawback: trust is fickle." Pseudonymity "may embolden parties" to buy drugs, launder money, or commit tax evasion.
As the project came to a close, the problematic experience of pseudonymity (coupled with the war itself) had divergent effects on the career trajectories of the two poets.
Pseudonymity as Self-Naming: The Pseudonym and the Performer in Zimbabwean Socio-Technial Spaces.
The former would weigh in favor of allowing the pseudonymity, while the latter would weigh against it.
The last feature of cryptocurrencies that makes them attractive is pseudonymity (62).
Authorship, Pseudonymity, and Trademark Law, 80 NOTRE DAME L.
On the other hand, the key may designate a persistent digital identity hiding the associated real-world person, "pseudonymity," or, it may give no information at all about identity, "anonymity."
Only with time and the acquisition of a fixed character do players tend to make the critical passage from anonymity to pseudonymity, developing the concern for their character's reputation that marks the attainment of virtual adulthood.