pseudoscience


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pseu·do·sci·ence

 (so͞o′dō-sī′əns)
n.
A theory, methodology, or practice that is considered to be without scientific foundation.

pseu′do·sci′en·tif′ic (-ən-tĭf′ĭk) adj.
pseu′do·sci′en·tist n.

pseudoscience

(ˌsjuːdəʊˈsaɪəns)
n
a discipline or approach that pretends to be or has a close resemblance to science
ˌpseudoˌscienˈtific adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pseudoscience - an activity resembling science but based on fallacious assumptions
astrology, star divination - a pseudoscience claiming divination by the positions of the planets and sun and moon
alchemy - a pseudoscientific forerunner of chemistry in medieval times
fallacy, false belief - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
Translations
pavědapseudověda
Pseudowissenschaft
pseudociencia
áltudomány

pseudoscience

[ˈsjuːdəʊˌsaɪəns] npseudoscienza
References in periodicals archive ?
It sounds like pseudoscience but our tester, who has been known to take three or four one-a-day hay fever tablets in 24 hours when symptoms are at their worst, was able to ditch antihistamines completely while using the gadget.
It sounds like pseudoscience, but our tester, who has been known to take three or four one-a-day hay fever tablets in 24 hours when symptoms are at their worst, was able to ditch antihistamines completely while using the gadget.
It sounds like pseudoscience but our tester, who has been known to take three or four one-a-day hay fever tablets in 24 hours when symptoms are at their worst, was able to ditch antihistamines completely while THYROID DRUG 'NOT WORKING' THOUSANDS of patients are being prescribed thyroid drugs unnecessarily, research shows.
Campbell comes across as nearly deranged in his bullheaded attachment to eccentric pseudoscience; the archival research into his letters is Nevala-Lee's freshest contribution to science fiction historiography.
Harsha also practices medical graphology, a controversial branch of the science which is often rejected as pseudoscience or quackery by modern medicine.
He explains the blend of art and science that makes up nursing to emphasize the value of creative scientific thinking for practical nursing issues and for understanding how to avoid the pitfalls of non-science, pseudoscience, and even bad science along the way.
James Alcock, professor of psychology at Glendon College, York University, says about Horoscopes: Reality or Trickery?, "Pseudoscience often appeals because it is fascinating and exciting, but this book demonstrates that critical thinking about pseudoscience can be just as fascinating and exciting, while having the additional advantage of dealing with what is real."
And, of course, homeopathy's modus of action based on a highly diluted substance exceeding Avogadro's number was lambasted as absolute pseudoscience; one physicist was quoted as saying that a remedy of 30C potency would require an inconceivable volume to contain a single molecule of the original substance:
Suddenly here was something anyone could understand: credible pseudoscience.
The book itself makes for a compelling read, though it does occasionally delve dangerously close to pseudoscience. Criminal profiling remains a controversial investigative tool, but its popularity has been boosted somewhat by television shows and films.
Pseudoscience and science education Kunihiko SUZUKI, M.J.A.
A special closing event, This Molecular World, explored the creative approaches being developed in chemistry to tackle such things as healthcare for refugees, crises in aquaculture, reversing blindness and the social implications of fake news and pseudoscience. Speakers included Sir Martyn Poliakoff of Nottingham University, Joe Schwarcz of McCill University and U of T's Molly Shoichet, Gilbert Walker and Aaron Wheeler.